Nancy J. Cade

Chair, Division of Social Sciences
Davenport Distinguished Professor of History and Political Science

Office: Armington 450
Telephone: 606.218.5007
E-mail: NancyCade@upike.edu




American Chief Executive
American Government and Politics
American History Survey
British History
Comparative Government
Development of the U.S. Constitution
International Relations
Modern European History
Russia and the Soviet Union
Twentieth Century American History
World Civilization Survey

Ph. D., Social Science (American History) with cognates in
World History and Political Science

Ball State University

M.A., World History (major) and Political Science (minor)
Ball State University

B.S., Social Science, Teaching Certificate
Ball State University

Faculty Leader of the Year 2007, The Washington Center
Who’s Who in America, since 2001
Walker Teaching Award, 1999
The Sears-Roebuck Foundation Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership Award, 1990
Outstanding Young Women in America, 1987

Dr. Cade is a native Hoosier but has lived in Pikeville since 1986. She is actively involved in The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars and has served as a faculty leader at several seminars since 2004. Her major interests outside academics are travel, reading and animals. She is an active supporter of The Morris Animal Foundation, The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and The Humane Society of the United States. She and her husband, John, reside in Pikeville with the world’s cutest cocker spaniel and four of the world’s most adorable cats.



Ashton Bartley

Visiting Professor of Social Work and Field Coordinator 

Office: Armington 465
Telephone: 606.218.5001
E-mail: AshtonBartley@upike.edu





Stephen P. Budney

Professor of History 

Office: Armington 434
Telephone: 606.218.5009
E-mail: StephenBudney@upike.edu





America Enters the Modern Age, 1865-1900
American Foreign Relations, 1781-Present
American History Surveys
Americans United and Divided, 1781-1865
Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1600-1781
Historiography and Methodology
Imperial China
Modern China, 1644-Present
World Civilization Surveys

Bachelor of Arts in History
University of Maine

Master of Arts in History
University of Maine

Doctor of Science in History
University of Mississippi

President’s Pin for Academic Achievement, University of Maine
Gilder-Lehrner Fellowship to Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, Columbia University

Dr. Budney was born in Hartford, Conn., but considers Brooklyn to be his home town. He is the author of William Jay, Abolitionist and Anticolonialist, and has also written articles on subjects ranging from naval history to Asian cinema. He enjoys working on cars and motorcycles, motorsports, Muay Thai and travel. He has two Greyhounds and has been active in animal rescue for several years, working with American Brittany Rescue and the Greyhound Placement Service.




Leanne M. Epling

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Office: Armington 427
Telephone: 606.218.5018
E-mail: LeanneEpling@upike.edu





General Psychology
Lifespan Development
Physiological and Biological Psychology
History of Psychology
Experimental Psychology
First-Year Studies

Ph.D., Applied Experimental Psychology
Central Michigan University

M.S., General Experimental Psychology
Central Michigan University

B.S., Psychology with a minor in Human Development 
Central Michigan University

Forquer, L. M., Camden, A. E., Gabriau, K. M., & Johnson, C. M. (2008). Sleep patterns of
college students at a public university. Journal of American College Health, 56, 563-565.

Forquer, L., Drury, S., Culver, T., Hutchens, S., Shuttlesworth, D., & Jones, R. (2008). Frequent testing and
student performance. Delta Education Journal, 5, 42-45.

Hutchens, S., Drury, S., Shuttlesworth, D., Forquer, L., Culver, T., & Jones, R. (2008). PowerPoint is not
necessarily evil: Applying theories of cognitive processing to increase the effectiveness of instructional
technology. Delta Education Journal, 5, 46-58.

Jones, R., Forquer, L., Culver, T., Shuttlesworth, D., Drury, S., & Hutchens, S. (2008). Student engagement:
After the honeymoon. Delta Education Journal, 5, 33-41.

Forquer, L. M., & Johnson, C. M. (2007). Continuous white noise to reduce sleep latency and night wakings in
college students. Sleep and Hypnosis, 9, 60-66.

Forquer, L., Jones, R., Drury, S., Culver, T., Hutchens, S., & Shuttlesworth, D. (2007). Incorporating mass media into the classroom. Delta Education Journal, 4, 29-31.

Forquer, L. M., & Johnson, C. M. (2005). Continuous white noise to reduce resistance going to sleep and
night wakings in toddlers. Child & Family Behavior Therapy, 27, 1-10.

Dr. Epling is a member of the Association for Psychological Science (APS), the Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA), and the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP). She is the faculty advisor for Psi CHI, the national honor society of psychology and lives in Pikeville with her Chihuahua and five cats.




Jennifer Harvey

Adjunct Instructor of Communication 

E-mail: JenniferHarvey@upike.edu







Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Masters of Arts in Communication
Morehead State University

Bachelor of Arts in Communication and English
Pikeville College

While Jennifer Harvey spends her Tuesday nights teaching on UPIKE’s campus, her days are spent at the Piarist School in Martin, Ky., as a full-time English teacher. There she has taught grammar and composition, English I, introduction to literature, American literature, journalism, mythology, public speaking, interpersonal communication and literary criticism.
Harvey also enjoys teaching a ladies group at Third Ave. Free will Baptist Church in Prestonsburg where she has been a youth leader and pianist for many years.
In her spare time she enjoys traveling, reading and watching television with her husband and their two cats, Molly and Romeo.




John L. Howie

Professor of Psychology and Program Coordinator

Office: Armington 437
Telephone: 606.218.5006
E-mail: JohnHowie@upike.edu





General Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Personality
Psychology of Religion
Psychology of Film in Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, The Hunger games, Japanese anime, Joseph Campbell’s heroic journey in all of the preceding.
Psychosocial Adjustment to Archetypes
Dreams into Consciousness

Special Topics and Senior Seminars:
Mesoamerican Mythology & Dreams
Harry, Frodo, & Luke
Synchronicity & Dreams
Archetypal Psychology: Hilllbilly as Trickster;
Paradigms in Chaos
Dreaming with duende

Senior Capstone: Interdisciplinary Commons: Law, Justice and Society:
Amidst the Chinese, Aztecs and Irish
Pirates in Myth and Reality
Psychology of War
Ecopsychology in the Incan Cosmovision

Abroad
With Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS) in Japan in 2009:
  Psychology of Film: Anime Archetypes
  Psychology of Religion in Japanese Gardens
With KEI at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola in Cusco, Peru in 2013:
  Ecopsychology from Cusco to Machu Picchu in Peru

Other Schools:
For Lindsey Wilson School of Professional Counseling:
  Counseling Theories and Techniques: Humanistic & Affective (Graduate)
  Abnormal Psychology
  Substance Abuse
For University of Texas at Arlington: Lecturer on Moral Philosophy
For University of Texas at Dallas: Lecturer on American Modernism
For El Centro College in Dallas: Associate Instructor of English Composition

Ph.D., M.A. in Archetypal & Phenomenological Psychology
  Minor in Literature    University of Dallas in 1986, 1981

B.A. in Philosophy
Swarthmore College, Pa. in 1975

Additionally:
The C.G. Jung Institute & Zurich Universitat in Switzerland
The Goethe Institute in Germany
The Naropa Institute of Buddhist Studies in Boulder, Colo.

Incan Ruins and shamanistic culture in Peru from Cusco to Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca
Aztec and Mayan ruins in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, & Belize
Taught, studied & traveled in Germany, Switzerland, Salzburg, Mexico, Japan, & Peru
Hitch-hiked from Columbia to Argentina in early seventies
Foreign exchange student in India in sixties

John Lee Howie was born in Nashville, Tenn.,. His parents moved to Huntsville, Ala., where he grew up with seven brothers and sisters. His parents were active in the Civil Rights movement of the early 1960’s and introduced him to a strong sense of civic and social responsibility. Howie graduated from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, where the mission of the school is to “help students realize their full intellectual and personal potential combined with a deep sense of ethical and social concern.” This is one of the guiding principles to Howie’s teaching style towards his own students.

After receiving his undergraduate degree, Howie studied a couple of summers at the Naropa Institute of Buddhist Studies, now the University of Naropa, in Boulder, Colo. He then spent a year in Germany and Switzerland, learning German at the Goethe Institute and then studying at the Jung Institute in Zurich. He completed both his master's and doctoral degrees in archetypal and phenomenological psychology at the University of Dallas where he studied under James Hillman, a prolific writer who founded the field of archetypal psychology.

Howie has spent his lifetime traveling and studying abroad, beginning as a teenager, when he traveled with his family to Bolivia. In high school he was an exchange student in India with AFS. As a young man he traveled widely in South America, Mexico and Europe. As a result of the total immersion experience of living in different cultures, he became more or less proficient in several languages, including Spanish, German, French and Portuguese.

In 1991, Howie began teaching at what was then Pikeville College in Kentucky as an assistant professor. He is now coordinator of the psychology program and a professor of psychology at the University of Pikeville. He is a Salzburg Fellow from the Salzburg Institute in Austria. He has been on several trips abroad to foster this internationalization of education, both on his own campus as well as in the Appalachian College Association (ACA), including travel to Austria, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, Japan and Peru. He has taught in Japan with KIIS, as well as in Peru at the Cusco campus of USIL, Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola. He remains committed to the idea of the globalization of students in the attempt to both empower students and to show them the relationships between themselves and the rest of the world. He feels that the knowledge of other cultures is key to a deeper understanding of the unique culture of the Appalachia, whence come the majority of his students. As they learn the similarities between their own cultures and others, while appreciating what make each one unique, the students are enriched with deeper appreciation for their own roots and home place as well as the world.

Howie has always taught psychology from an archetypal perspective, which allows him to include mythology, philosophy, religion, Japanese gardens, films, popular culture and cross-cultural as well as transpersonal psychology in his courses. He has taught a seminar on dreams for the last 22 years, as well as courses on shamanism and the psychology of religion. Most recently, his interest has turned towards ecopsychology, a course which he has taught both in Appalachia and the Andes. Highlanders everywhere have very similar issues with the unsustainable exploitation of both their natural and their human resources. He first noticed this correlation in Guatemala with the Mayans, and it was further corroborated by his studies of the Incas in the Andes. The Incan cosmovision of how to treat the earth, Pachamama, with both respect and in the spirit of reciprocity, is a notion whose time has come. Indigenous peoples everywhere have always known this. Only now are we beginning to realize that we must recollect what we have always known if we and our brethren sentient beings are to survive.

Chair of ad hoc Global Education Committee since 2012
ACA Global Education Community of Practice Planning Committee since 2010
BFREE/ACA Belize Collaboration Planning Trip in 2008
KIIS: Campus Representative and Board of Director Member since 2007
ACA Study Abroad Shadow Grant to Morelia, Mexico with KIIS in 2004
ACA Faculty Development Trip to Morelia in 2003
Salzburg Fellow since 2001

Archetypal & Jungian Psychology
Ecopsychology
Transpersonal Psychology and “Eastern Religions”
Shamanism and indigenous religions
History of Shifting Scientific Paradigms
World Mythologies and Fairy Tales
Dreams and Synchronicity
Chaos and Complexity Theory
Appalachian History and Hillbilly Stereotypes as Tricksters

Papers Presented:
  “Hillbilly or Redneck? The Boundary Condition for Crossing Borders in O’Brother, Where art Thou” at Appalachian Studies Association at 25th ASA
  Creating Chaos out of the Void in Mesoamerica at Chaos Theory in Psychology and the Life Sciences Conference in Boston in Summer 2003
  Hillbilly Shadows Boxing at The Sixth Interdisciplinary Conference on Science and Culture at Kentucky State University in 1995
  Incest and Innocence: a phenomenological profile at Conference on Cultural Psychology: Healing the World Soul with the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture in 1986

Films with students at Appalachian Study Associations Conferences:
  Co-producer of, actor in, and convener of:
Der Ewige Hillbilly”: A short Film and facilitated discussion of pernicious Appalachian stereotypes at the 25th ASA 2002.
  Sissystrata: A Short Film and Facilitated Discussion about Patriarchy and Violence in Appalachia at 26th ASA in Cherokee in 2003
  Hillbilly Heroin(e) at 27th Annual ASA in Cherokee in 2004
  “A Retrospective on the Future of Appalachia: Der Ewige Hillbilly, Sissystrata, & Hillbilly Heroin(e)” presented with colleagues at 30th ASA in 2007
  Revisiting Stereotypes: From Mockumentary to Documentary at 37th ASA Conference at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia in 2014

Presentations at Appalachian College Association:
  Belize It or Not, We BEFREE: at the 11th Annual ACA Summit in 2008
  “Southern Highlanders from Appalachia to Guatemala” at the 10th Annual in 2007

Publications:
  Further Up the Holler: Breaking the Hillbilly Stereotype published in Spring 69: A Journal of Archetype and Culture in 2002
  Doctoral Dissertation: Catharsis and the Seeress in Theater and Therapy in 1986




Genesia Kilgore-Bowling

Social Work Program Director
Associate Professor of Social Work
 

Office: Armington 464
Telephone: 606.218.5011
E-mail: GenesiaKilgoreBowling@upike.edu





Introduction to Social Work
Development of Social Welfare
Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Professional Ethics
Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities
Professional Communication Skills
Social Welfare Policy: Theory and Practice
Senior Seminar – Capstone
First Year Studies
Special topic courses in the Behavioral Factors of Death and Dying
Supervision of Independent Study courses
Graduate level courses in social welfare policy and practicum supervision

Ph.D. Candidate – Social Work
University of Kentucky

Master of Social Work (MSW)
University of Kentucky

Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Communication, and Human Services Area of Concentration)
Pikeville College

Professor Kilgore-Bowling was born and raised right here in Pike County, Kentucky. As a first generation college student and daughter of a coal miner, she was determined to seek an education in a field that would allow her to give back to the Appalachian community that had given so much to her. This determination led her to spend her college days at Pikeville and to receive a master’s degree in social work from the University of Kentucky. Shortly after completing her MSW, Professor Kilgore-Bowling began her teaching career as an adjunct for the UK College of Social Work. This prompted her to enroll in doctoral classes at UK to further develop her teaching and research skills. She joined the Pikeville College faculty in the fall of 2006 as an interim instructor in the psychology department. During that time, she was instrumental in establishing the social work major at the University of Pikeville and was appointed as the first director of the social work program in 2007. In addition to her teaching and program administrative duties, Professor Kilgore-Bowling enjoys sponsoring and co-sponsoring student groups. She is also very active within the community and is a member of the board of directors of several nonprofit agencies within the service area.

If she isn’t at work at the college or working somewhere in the community, then it is likely that you will find her trying to keep up with her young son, Elathan or at the local Artist Collaborative Theatre with which her family is very active. Professor Kilgore-Bowling also enjoys traveling, reading, all genres of music, watching movies, and spending time with her extended family and friends. However, her absolute favorite thing to do is to spend a quiet evening at home with Elathan and her husband, Terry.

Kentucky Citizens Review Panel, Eastern Mountain Region, Member of the Year - 2009
William Wade and Helen Record Walker Teaching Excellence Award - Pikeville College, 2007-2008 academic year.
Dorothy A. Miller Professorship Scholarship – University of Kentucky – 2006
Outstanding Academic Achievement Award University of Kentucky - 2003
Outstanding Master of Social Work Student – University of Kentucky - 2003
Martha Davis Scholarship Award – University of Kentucky – 2000

Social Work Education
Curriculum Development
Online pedagogical approaches
Rural, Appalachian social work
Informal end-of-life caregiving
Behavioral factors of death and dying
Discrimination
Social and Economic Justice
Fat studies
Health at every size




Rachel Little

Visiting Instructor of Communication 

Office: Armington 419 B
Telephone: 606.218.5012
E-mail: RachelLittle@upike.edu





Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Advanced Public Speaking
Oral Interpretation
Introduction to Communication
Interpersonal Communication

Master of Arts in Communication with an emphasis in Adult and Higher Education
Morehead State University

Bachelor of Science in Communication
Pikeville College

Bachelor of Science in Human Services
Pikeville College

Rachel Little is a native of Eastern Kentucky. She graduated from UPIKE (then Pikeville College) in 2005. During her time at the university, she was a member of the speech team and qualified to compete at a national level. Following graduation, she pursued a career with Girl Scouts as a membership specialist. She also held management and training positions with independent living companies supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She has experience working with Federal TRiO programs through UPIKE’s Upward Bound program. Rachel completed a graduate degree in December of 2012 and formerly served as an adjunct instructor for UPIKE.

In her spare time, Little teaches Zumba, POUND and Bokwa group fitness classes. She loves scary movies and Halloween attractions in the fall, spending time with her dog, visiting amusement parks, and traveling.




Chandra K. Massner

Associate Professor of Communication 

Office: Armington 420
Telephone: 606.218.5004
E-mail: ChandraMassner@upike.edu





Advanced Journalism
Desktop Publishing
Gender & Communication
Introduction to Communication
Introduction to Journalism
Mass Media in Society
Principles of Editing & Design
Public Speaking
Public Relations
Senior Seminar in Communication
Yearbook Production

Doctor of Philosophy (ABD), Communication
University of Kentucky

Master of Arts, Communication
University of Kentucky

Bachelor of Science, Journalism
Ohio University

Chandra K. Massner grew up traveling around the country. She was born in an Army hospital in Texas but considers Cincinnati, Ohio, to be her home. In addition to Kentucky and Ohio, she has lived in Canada, Georgia, Louisiana and California, where she graduated from high school. She was a resident assistant during her undergraduate career at Ohio University and was a hall director at the University of Kentucky. She also taught journalism courses and assisted with the Ad Club at UK. After graduate work, she began working at the University of Pikeville. Before teaching, she served as the college grant writer. In addition to her teaching duties, she advises the college newsletter, The Bear Facts and the college yearbook as well as Lambda Pi Eta, the communication honor society.
She is a Girl Scout leader and program coordinator for the county. When she’s not at a University of Pikeville or Girl Scout event, she is usually with her daughter, Amanda Mae, as she stays busy with the University of Pikeville Dance Studio, Pike County 4-H, Christ Central Academic Team and Pikeville Aquatic Club. The two are also members at Vogel Day United Methodist Church.
Chandra loves to travel. When she is not in classes, she is often traveling to see her parents who retired out West. She is also a board member for the Kentucky Institute for International Studies where she taught in the Costa Rica program in the summer of 2009. Chandra and Amanda like to rest at home with their cats while they play board games with friends.




Eric S. Primm

Associate Professor of Sociology 

Office: Armington 423
Telephone: 606.218.5041
E-mail: EricPrimm@upike.edu





Addictive Behavior
Cultural Geography
Deviance in U.S. Society
Drug Policy Analysis
Drugs and Society
Introduction to Social Statistics
Introduction to Sociology
Race and Ethnicity
Research Methods
Sex, Gender and Society
Social Stratification
Sociology of Sport
Sociology of the Family

Ph.D. in Sociology
University of Colorado at Boulder

B.S. in Sociology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Class Culture
Deviance
Drugs and Drug Policy
History and Politics of Gun Control
Popular Culture
Race, Class and Gender Stratification

Primm, Eric, Nicole Piquero, Robert M. Regoli, and Alex Piquero. Forthcoming. 
“Racial Bias in Baseball Card Collecting Revisited.” The Social Science Journal.

Primm, Eric, Nicole Piquero, Robert M. Regoli, and Alex Piquero. Forthcoming. 
“Investigating Customer Racial Discrimination in the Secondary Baseball Card Market.”
Sociological Inquiry.

Regoli, Robert M., Wade P. Smith, and Eric Primm. Forthcoming. 
“A Comment on Consumer Discrimination of Basketball Card Collectors.” The Social Science Journal.

Primm, Eric, Nicole Piquero, Robert M. Regoli and Alex Piquero, 2010.
“The Role of Race in Football Card Prices.” Social Science Quarterly 91-129-142.

Primm, Eric, Robert R. Preuhs, Robert M. Regoli and John D. Hewitt.
“The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same. Race on
the cover of Sports Illustrated.” National Social Science Journal 35, 1:118-127.

Primm, Eric, Robert M. Regoli, and John D. Hewitt. 2009 “Race, Fear and Firearms:
The Roles of Demographics and Guilt Assuagement in the Creation of a Political
Partition.” Journal of African American Studies 13:63-73.

Primm, Eric, Robert M. Regoli, and John D. Hewitt. 2008. “Where Are We and How
Did We Get Here? Assessing Race, Performance, and Position in Topps Football
Card Placement.” Journal of African American Studies 12:73-84.

Coffey, Shannon M., Eric Primm, and Robert M. Regoli. 2007. “Rap and Hip-Hop in
Academia: Demographics and Their Influence on Pedagogy.” Free Inquiry in
Creative Sociology
35:3-11.

Primm, Eric, Summer Dubois, and Robert Regoli. 2007. “An Exercise in Subtleties and
the Transmission of Racism: An Analysis of Sports Illustrated Covers.” Journal of
African American Studies
11:239-250.

Primm, Eric, Summer DuBois, and Robert M. Regoli. 2007. “Every Picture Tells a
Story: Racial Representation on Sports Illustrated Covers.” Journal of American
Culture
30:222-231.

Regoli, Robert M., Eric Primm, and John D. Hewitt. 2007. “Men and Boys and the
Price of their Toys: Race and the Value of Football Cards.” The Social Science
Journal
44:563-571.

Regoli, Robert M., Eric Primm, and John D. Hewitt. 2007. “Tackled in the Red Zone:
The Impact of Race on Football Card Values.” Electronic Journal of Sociology
8:28-51.

Regoli, Robert M., Eric Primm, and John D. Hewitt. 2007. “Where O’ Where did my
Baseball Cards Go? Race, Performance, and Placement in the Topps Era,
1956-1980.” The Social Science Journal 44:742-750.

Primm, Eric, Robert M. Regoli, and John D. Hewitt. 2006. “Does Membership have its
Rewards? The Effects of Race and Hall of Fame Membership on Football Card
Values.” Sociological Spectrum 26:369-385.






Emily Richardson

Assistant Professor of Communication 

Office: Armington 309 B
Telephone: 606.218.5002
E-mail: EmilyRichardson@upike.edu





Introduction to Communication
Fundamentals of Public Speaking Communication Theory
Interpersonal Communication
Language, Communication & Culture
Business & Professional Communication
Conflict Resolution
Engineering Communication

Ph.D. in Communication
University of Texas at Austin

M.A. in Communication
Ball State University

B.A. in Communication
DePauw University

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles
Richardson, E. (2013). Social construction of self: Narratives of verbally abusive relationships. Florida Communication Journal, 41, 97-105.
Blackburn, K., LeFebvre, L., & Richardson, E. (2013). Technological task interruptions in the classroom. Florida Communication Journal, 41, 107-116.
Manuscripts Under Review & In Progress
Richardson, E. (under review). Social support and communication online: An examination of family caregiver narratives. The Qualitative Report.
Donovan, E. E., Bute, J. J., Richardson, E., Zaitchik, S., & Crook, B. (in preparation). Requests for information: Multiple meanings and threats to face.
Richardson, E. (in preparation). Courtroom communication: Front stage and back stage discourse.
Richardson, E. (in preparation). Communication challenges in adult day care systems: Institutional and family perspectives.
Richardson, E., LeFebvre, L., & Blackburn, K. (in preparation). Accounts of abuse: A discursive analysis of evaluation and identity construction.
Refereed Conference Papers & Presentations
Richardson, E. (2014, November). Communication challenges in family violence court: An ethnography of protective order hearings. Paper to be presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.
Richardson, E. (2013, November). Communication, agency, and care management in adult day  care systems. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Washington, DC.
Bute, J. J., Donovan-Kicken, E., Zaitchik, S., & Richardson, E. (2012, November). Requests for information as face threatening acts. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Orlando, FL.
Tollison, A., Maxwell, M., Richardson, E., & Green, E. (2012, November). Local and longitudinal facework strategies: Conflict communication and restoration of social and moral order. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Orlando, FL.
Richardson, E. (2012, April). Social support and communication online: An examination of family caregiver narratives. Paper presented at the annual convention of the Southern States Communication Association, San Antonio, TX.
Richardson, E., Maxwell, M., Tollison, A., & Green, E. (2011, November). Narratives of restoration in mediation: A new lens for understanding conflict communication. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.
Maxwell, M., Green, E., Richardson, E., & Tollison, A. (2011, November). Reflections of disputants' emotions: The mediator as a proxy communicator for difficult messages. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.
Donovan-Kicken, E., Bute, J. J., Richardson, E., & Zaitchik, S. (2011, November). It depends on why you ask me: The multiple meanings of intrusive requests for information. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.
Richardson, E. (2010, November). Understanding communication in the public courtroom: An ethnographic approach. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.
Maxwell, M., Richardson, E., Tollison, A., & Green, E. (2010, November). Metaphor and other figurative language use as devises for building bridges during conflict: New insights into conflict resolution. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, San Francisco, CA.
Tollison, A., Green, E., Maxwell, M., & Richardson, E. (2010, May). Modeling community conflict mediation processes. Paper presented at the annual convention of the International Communication Association, Singapore.
Tollison, A., Green, E., Maxwell, M., & Richardson, E. (2010, July). Language choices that promote forward movement. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the International Peace Research Association, Sydney, Australia.
Richardson, E. (2009, November). Getting 'lost' in the cycle: Women's disclosure of changing identity in verbally abusive relationships. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.
Romo, L., Goins, E. S., Blackburn, K., Douglas, E., & Heller, A. (2009, November). How to parlay your communication MA into a successful career in or outside of academia. Roundtable presented to the Masters Student Division at the annual convention of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Graduate School Fellowship, Department of Communication Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Teaching Scholarship, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin
Professional Development Award, Graduate School, University of Texas at Austin
Graduate Teaching Assistantship, University of Texas at Austin
Graduate Research Assistantship, Ball State University

International Association for Relationship Research (IARR)
International Communication Association (ICA)
National Communication Association (NCA)
Florida Communication Association (FCA)
National Federation of Press Women (NFPW)

Emily Richardson grew up in Muncie, Ind.. She received her bachelor's degree from DePauw University, her master's degree from Ball State, and her Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests focus on language and communication within family and community contexts, with particular attention to issues of conflict and family violence issues. She lives in Pikeville with her husband Tim and their dog Irie. She loves working with students and strives to provide an environment where they can explore the role that communication plays in their lives.


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