Andrew Buzzelli O.D., M.S., FAAO

Vice President for Optometric Education
Founding Dean, Kentucky College of Optometry
Professor of Optometry


Office: Health Professions Education Building 603
Telephone: 606.218.5510
E-mail: AndrewBuzzelli@upike.edu



Leadership in Healthcare and Personal Development
Binocular Vision

Doctor of Optometry
Illinois College of Optometry
Chicago, Illinois

Master of Science in Vision and Child Development
State University of New York–College of Optometry
New York, New York

Bachelor of Science
Illinois College of Optometry
Chicago, Illinois

Associate of Arts
Monmouth College
Long Branch, New Jersey

2011-2014 Dean of the University of the Incarnate Word Rosenberg School of Optometry

Founding Dean of Visual Science Program, University of the Incarnate Word

Founding Dean of Physician Assistant Program, University of the Incarnate Word

Advisory Board member of St. Phillip’s College, Veteran’s Outreach and Transition Center

Director of Advanced Studies, Salus University
Associate Professor of Optometry, Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University

Associate Professor of Optometry, State University of New York, State College of Optometry

Professional Practice, Specialty in Pediatric Optometry and Binocular Vision Rehabilitation, Marlboro, New Jersey

Lecturer in Education, Georgian Court University

Admissions Liaison Officer, United States Air Force Academy

U.S. Air Force Liaison Officer, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Chief of Optometry, 105th Military Airlift Wing

Executive Council Member, National Board of Examiners in Optometry
Refractive Conditions Committee – Chair

Staff Optometrist, Fort Dix Federal Corrections Facility

Member of the Neptune Board of Health

Consulting Staff Member for the Health South Rehabilitation Hospital, Toms River, New Jersey

Consulting Staff Member for the Keswick Rehabilitation Center, Whiting, New Jersey

Consulting Staff Member for the Country Manor Rehabilitation Center, Toms River, New Jersey

Staff Optometrist, New Hope Drug Rehabilitation Foundation

2014 City of San Antonio Health Care Hero
2012 Texas Optometric Educator of The Year
2009 Meritorious Service Award – 105th Military Airlift Wing
2006 Meritorious Service Award – Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
2005 Global War on Terrorism Medal – United States Air Force
2002 Humanitarian of the Year Award – Illinois College of Optometry
2002 United States Air Force Meritorious Service Medal – 1st Oak Leaf Cluster
2002 New York State Commendation Medal
1997 United States Air Force Meritorious Service Medal
1995 United States Air Force Reserve Forces Medal
1993 Outstanding Liaison Officer of the Year - United States Air Force Academy
1992 Outstanding Liaison Officer of the Year - United States Air Force Academy
1989 Air Force Longevity Award
1988 United States Air Force Outstanding Officer Northeast Region
1986 Air Force Commendation Award
1973 Outstanding Senior - Illinois College of Optometry
Outstanding Leadership and Service Award - Illinois College of Optometry
Illinois College of Optometry Alumni Scholarship
Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities
Illinois College of Optometry Dean’s List
Alumni Achievement Award
1972 Illinois College of Optometry Fellowship Recipient
1970 Student Council Service Award
Huffman Memorial Achievement Award

Diplomate in Binocular Vision and Visual Perception of the American Academy of Optometry

Bioterrorism and Bacterial Agents in Bioterrorism, in: Ocular Therapeutics Handbook: A Clinical Manual 2nd Edition, Edited by Bruce Onofrey, Leonid Skorin, and Nicky Holdeman. New York: Williams and Wilkens Co. 2005.

More Choices For More Students: The Pathways For Scholars Initiative At The Pennsylvania College Of Optometry, Salus University, USA, A. Di Stefano, L. Casser, P. Barker, A. Buzzelli, J. Scharre, 2010 World Conference on Optometric Education, Poster Presentation, 2010, September.

The Expeditionary Optometrist. Air National Guard Optometric Assoc. Newsletter, 2001, May.

Who Are You Now, America? The Question of 9-11-2001, Proceedings, Biological Threats Reduction, 2002, March.

The Differential Diagnosis of Accommodative Dysfunction - Military Implications The Journal of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, 2001, March

Protecting Vision in Lyme Disease. Optometry Today, 1997, October.

Child and Spousal Abuse: Your Role in Stopping It. Review of Optometry, 1997, August.

MD Links Shape OD’s Practice. Optometry Today, 1997, January.

What Do You Do After The Plane Lands? Air National Guard Optometric Association News, 1996, May.

Problem Based Learning in a Large Group Situation. Journal of the Association of Optometric Educators, 1993, October.

Visual Acuity, Stereopsis, Heterophoria and Accommodation; Do They Related to Dyslexia?, the American Journal of Optometry and Physiological Optics, 1991, November.

The Measurement of Visual Efficiency Standards for Pilots in the United States Air Force. Military Medicine, 1989, July.

A Slavery of Silence. Upper Room Publications, 1990, October.

Vergence Facility: Development Trends in a School-Age Population. The American Journal of Optometry and Physiological Optics, 1986, May.

Differential Diagnosis of Perceptual Dysfunction. Journal of the College of Optometrists for Visual Development, 1984, September.

Transformation to Being. Sword of the Spirit, 1984, July.

Poor Vergence Facility May Be A Diagnostic Indicator for Dyslexia. Optometry Times, April, 1984.

Visual Acuity, Stereopsis, Accommodative and Vergence Facility: Do They Relate to Dyslexia? Optometry Times, 1983, February.

See Straight to Shoot Straight, Vision Therapy and Marksmanship. Trap and Field, 1982, December.

See Straight to Shoot Straight, Vision and Marksmanship. Trap and Field, 1982, November.

The Christ Consciousness in the Marriage Relationship. Sword of the Spirit, 1982, October.

Presbyopia and Binocular Vision Dysfunction. Review of Optometry, 1981, January.

Tilt After-Effect in Constant and Periodic Strabismus. American Journal of Optometry and Physiological Optics, 1981, December.

Function and Academic Achievement. Symposium Selected Workshop Papers on Learning Disabilities, Rutgers University, 1978, October.

Clinical Assessment of the Tilt After-Effect. American Journal of Optometry and Physiological Optics, 1978, September.

Clinical Utilization of the WISC Profile. New Jersey Journal of Optometry, 1978, May.

Literature Review, Waysider: Learning and Dyslexia. New Jersey Journal of Optometry, 1977, February.

Dr. Buzzelli, served as dean and professor of the Rosenberg School of Optometry at University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas, and assumed the leadership position in July. Recognized as an authority in the field of binocular vision and visual perception, he has taught programs in the diagnosis and treatment of acquired brain injury, pediatric optometry and binocular vision, as well as child abuse and intimate partner violence. Buzzelli is one of 36 optometrists in the world recognized as a diplomat in binocular vision and perception for the American Academy of Optometry.

Buzzelli received his doctorate in optometry from the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago, Ill. He holds a Master of Science degree in child development and visual perception from the State University of New York. He has practiced in the private health care sector as a specialist in dysfunctions of binocular vision and visual information processing disorders. Academic appointments include the State University of New York, Salus University, where he was also appointed to the board of trustees, and Georgian Court University.

A noted international lecturer, Buzzelli served as a consultant to the National Aeronautic and Space Administration for the medical protocols currently utilized on the International Space Station. The author of more than 25 articles in both optometric and military publications and a recognized expert in the field of chemical and biological weapons, Buzzelli authored the first-ever ophthalmic textbook series for the treatment and management of injuries resultant from terrorist attack.

A retired colonel in the United States Air Force, Buzzelli has held command positions as the chief of optometry for the 105th Military Airlift Wing and commander of the 105th Medical Group. He served as the assistant to the command surgeon for Air Force Material Command and was selected as the chief advisor to the Air Force Surgeon General on matters of policy, operations and utilization of the entire 107,000 membership of the Air National Guard.




Donnie Akers, O.D.

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Assistant Professor of Optometry



Office: Health Professions Education Building 602
Telephone: 606.218.5516
E-mail: DonnieAkers@upike.edu


Ocular Anatomy and Ocular Histology
Ocular Physiology and Ocular Pharmacology
Gross Anatomy, Histology and Radiographic Techniques
NeuroAnatomy and NeuroScience
 

Doctor of Optometry
Indiana University School of Optometry
Bloomington, Ind.

Bachelor of Science in Biology and Chemistry
University of Pikeville
Pikeville, Ky.
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

Kentucky Optometry Contract Seat Scholarship
Presidential Scholarship (UPIKE)
Armington Math and Science Award (UPIKE)
 

An Eastern Kentucky native, Akers received a presidential scholarship to attend the University of Pikeville where he studied biology and chemistry. Upon graduation, he taught as an adjunct laboratory instructor of microbiology and physical science at UPIKE before being accepted at the Indiana University School of Optometry with a Kentucky Contract Seat Scholarship. There he worked and studied as a teaching assistant in gross anatomy and ocular anatomy and graduated among the top tier of his class.

Following graduation, Akers acquired management and co-ownership of a large group practice in Paintsville, Ky. For more than 15 years he served thousands of patients covering nine counties with primary eye care and ocular disease management. He has worked for the Veterans Administration for more than 10 years providing eye care at the Prestonsburg community-based outpatient clinic. Akers has served his community through service on the Johnson County Health Board, Rotary Club, Main Street Board and the Chamber of Commerce. He participates in multiple charities aimed at providing free or low cost glasses to local families in need and has traveled to Nicaragua to provide free eye care.
 




George Asimellis, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 401F
Telephone: 606.218.5521
E-mail: GeorgeAsimellis@upike.edu





Principles of Geometric Optics
Optics of the Eye and Clinical Implications
Fundamentals of Vision Science
Ophthalmic Surgery – Laser Procedures

Doctor of Philosophy
Tufts University, Medford, Mass.

Post-Doctorate Fellowship
Harvard University Medical School, Cambridge, Mass.

M.S. Physics
Tufts University, Medford, Mass.

Bachelor in Physics, Magna Cum Laude
University of Athens, Department of Physics, Athens (Greece)

Journal of Refractive Surgery (SLACK)
Eye and Vision (BioMed Central)
BioMed Research International (Hindawi Publishing Corporation)
BMC Ophthalmology (BioMed Central)
Asian Journal of Physics
International JOJ Ophthalmology (JOJO) - Juniper Publishers


Journal Review Member

  • Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
  • Cornea
  • Journal of Refractive Surgery
  • Optical Engineering
  • Applied Optics
  • Clinical Ophthalmology
  • SpectroChimica Acta Part B
  • Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Presentation award, IEEE, Boston, 1995
Presentation award, ASCRS, Boston, 2015

George Asimellis, Ph.D., joined University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Optometry from LaserVision Clinical and Research Eye Institute, Athens, Greece, where he was the research director. His current appointment as assistant professor includes development and coordination of the Geometric Optics and Vision Science Courses and development of the Laser Surgical Procedures Course.

He received his Ph.D. degree from Tufts University, Medford, Mass., and then completed a Fellowship at Wellman Labs of Photomedicine, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Subsequently, he worked as a Research and Development Optoelectronics Engineer in Washington, D.C. In the past he served as faculty in the Physics Department of Aristotle University (Greece), the Medical School of Democritus University (Greece), and the Electrical Engineering Department of George Mason University (Virginia). He has taught Optics and Visual Optics (Medical School, Democritus University, Graduate program ‘Ophthalmological Imaging), Laboratory Optics, Experimental (Physics Department, Aristotle University), and Optoelectronics - Optical Communications (George Mason University, Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept, Graduate program).

Asimellis has investigated optical signal processing and pattern recognition techniques (Tufts), and Optical Coherence Tomography (Harvard). He is credited with more than 70 peer-reviewed original research publications, has authored seven university-level books in optics and ocular imaging, and has a large number of presentations in international conferences and meetings. His research interests include optoelectronic devices, anterior-segment (corneal and epithelial) imaging, keratoconus screening, ocular optics, and surgical, laser-based correction of the ocular refractive error. His recent contributions involve publications in clinical in-vivo epithelial imaging and corneal cross-linking interventions



Roya Attar, O.D., M.B.A.

Assistant Professor of Optometry
Director of Professional Relations

Office: Health Professions Education Building 401B
Telephone: 606.218.5512
E-mail: RoyaAttar@upike.edu




Anterior Segment Disease
Ocular Anatomy & Ocular Histology
Clinical Skills
Ocular Pharmacology
Posterior Segment Disease

Masters in Healthcare Administration
UIW Rosenberg School of Optometry
San Antonio, Texas

Masters in Healthcare Administration
with an emphasis in Healthcare
University of Pikeville
Pikeville, Ky.

Bachelor of Science in Biology and Chemistry
The University of Memphis
Memphis, Tenn.
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

2010 Recipient of Ocular Instruments Award of Clinical Excellence
2011 Recipient of the RSO Mission Award
2011 Recipient of the J. Pat Cummings Award
2012 Recipient of the Texas State Optical Scholarship
2012 NOSA Leadership Scholarship Recipient
2012 Alcon/NOSA Leadership Award Recipient
2012 Winner of Transitions "Students of Vision" Scholarship
2012 First Ever Recipient of the Optometry Student of the Month for the month of March by OptometryStudents.com
2012 Recipient if the RSO Leadership Award
2012 Recipient of AFOS Student of the Year Award
2012 ASCO Ethics Scholarship
2012 Merton C. Flom Leadership Insight Program
2013 Allergan Award for Distinguished Achievement
2013 Alcon Clinical Case Report Award


 

Roya Attar, O.D., is an assistant clinical professor and the director of professional relations at the University of Pikeville - Kentucky College of Optometry. Attar completed her undergraduate degrees from the University of Memphis in Tennessee dual majoring in biology and chemistry. She received her Doctor of Optometry degree from the University of Incarnate Word Rosenberg School of Optometry in San Antonio, Texas. Attar has received a number of professional awards. She is an active member of a number of professional organizations and is involved in the Pikeville Rotary Club. Attar is board certified in optometry in the states of Kentucky and Texas. Prior to pursuing a career in optometry, Attar spent several years in the sales and marketing industry where she developed a unique and diverse set of skills that have served her well in her position at UPIKE. She has a passion for students and is personally dedicated to each student’s success and personal growth. She lives in Pikeville with her husband and two children. She enjoys gatherings with friends and family as well as the splendid natural beauty of Eastern Kentucky.

Rixon AJ, Trevino RC, Attar R.  Arm Yourself for Dry AMD. Rev of Optometry. January 2017:70-78 Rafieetary M, Huddleston S, Attar R. Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: How to Detect, How to Manage. Rev of Optometry. September 2017

 




Daniel H. Atchley, Ph.D., M.S., MT-ASCP

Associate Dean for Basic Sciences
Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Office: Coal Building
Telephone: 606.218.5502
E-mail: DanielAtchley@upike.edu




Osteopathic Medical College Courses
Medical Microbiology

Medical Immunology

Medical Physiology (select topics)

Pharmacy Courses
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Electives (research electives & Health & Wellness)

General Pathophysiology (Intro to pathophysiology, Cellular response to stress, injury, and aging, Genetic and congenital disorders, Cancer overview, Alterations in nutrition, Case studies, RBC disorders, Fluid/electrolyte/acid-base disorders, Alterations in hemostasis, Diabetes, Non-DM Endocrine disorders)

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Electives (Charitable Clinic Lab shadowing/Pharmacy-Service Learning)

Medical Immunology (all lectures)

Medical Microbiology (all lectures)

Pathophysiology (Immunopathology Primer, Acid-Base Disorders, Renal Disorders, RBC Disorders, WBC Disorders, Hypersensitivities, Antibody-based Therapeutics, Nutrition Disorders, Diabetes mellitus)

Pharmacology (Mechanisms of bacterial infection, Mechanisms of viral infection)

Research Electives

World Diseases (HIV, STIs)

Physician Assistant Courses
Clinical Medicine (Blood Constituents, Immunity and Inflammation, Introduction to Infectious Diseases, Mechanisms of Infectious Diseases, Acid-Base Disorders, Hematopoietic System, Disorders of Hemostasis, Endocrine Control)

Clinical Skills (Introduction to Laboratory Medicine, Phlebotomy, IV skills, Laboratory medicine II)

Undergraduate Courses
Extensive experience teaching 13 undergraduate biology, communication, and humanities courses; and mentoring students in research.

Doctor of Philosophy, Microbiology & Immunology
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C.

Masters of Science, Laboratory Medicine/Clinical Chemistry
University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

Bachelor of Science, Medical Technology
Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Okla.

Associate of Science, Biology
Tulsa Junior College, Tulsa, Okla.

Atchley is associate dean for basic sciences and associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine (KYCOM), where his responsibilities include oversight of the preclinical didactic disciplines, teaching basic medical sciences and conducting biomedical research. Atchley won the 2013-2014 KYCOM Educator of the Year Award for Teaching Excellence.

Before joining KYCOM, Atchley served as associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and director of assessment at Harding University College of Pharmacy, Searcy, Ark., where he directed the college’s assessment efforts, taught basic medical sciences and conducted biomedical research. While at Harding University, Atchley won the Teacher Achievement Award for Teaching Excellence.

Prior to joining the faculty at Harding University, Atchley completed a distinctive U.S. Air Force career, serving in various educational, research, clinical and advisory leadership roles. As an associate professor of biology at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo., he directed department resource allocations, and earned several teaching and research awards, including the U.S. Air Force Academy’s Outstanding Educator Award and Frank J. Seiler Excellence in Research Award for Basic Sciences. Additionally, he led molecular diagnostics research, and the Department of Defense Influenza Surveillance Program’s molecular diagnostics laboratory (a World Health Organization collaborating laboratory) as Chief of Molecular and Advanced Biotechnology, Brooks City-Base, Texas. Prior experience also includes managing a clinical diagnostics laboratory, mentoring scores of undergraduate students in applied research, and teaching various topics in microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology to medical technology students, physician assistant students, medical students and dental students.

Atchley has served as an advisor to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency for chemical and biological agent identification research. His areas of research interest include applied research in reliable and portable methods to diagnose disease in remote regions of the world and novel antimicrobial therapies for drug-resistant microorganisms.

Atchley received a Bachelor's of Science degree in medical technology from Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, a Master's of Science degree in laboratory medicine (clinical chemistry) from the University of Washington, and a doctoral degree in Microbiology and Immunology from the Medical University of South Carolina. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, the American Society for Microbiology, the American Osteopathic Association, the Society of Armed Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists, and Beta-Beta-Beta biological honors society.

Outstanding Educator of the Year
Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2014

Teacher Achievement Award for Teaching Excellence
Harding University, 2012

Frank J. Seiler Award for Research Excellence
US Air Force Academy, 2006

Outstanding Academy Educator Award for Teaching Excellence
US Air Force Academy, 1998

Promethean Educational Leadership Award for Teaching Excellence
US Air Force Academy, Department of Biology, 1997

Kamdem, L, Chen, S., Atchley, D.H., Murphy, M. (Revisions submitted Oct, 2015). Impact of Impact of UGT2B17 Gene Deletion on the Pharmacokinetics of 17-hydroexemestane in Healthy Volunteers. J. of Clin. Pharm.

Lee, Y., Atchley, D.H., Proctor, C.A., Smith, F.L., Yi, S., Loftis, C., Yates, K.M. (Accepted – Nov 2015). Time Kill Kinetics of a Novel Antimicrobial Silver Wound Gel Against Select Wound Pathogens. Wounds: A Compendium of Clinical Research and Practice

Craig D. Nowadly, Jason W. David, Melanie L. M. Grogger, Erik R. Demkowicz, Daniel H. Atchley, Donald V. Veverka (2014). Characterizations of the effects of heat stress on the DNA-intercalating dye EvaGreen for potential use with the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnostics System (JBAIDS). Military Medicine, 179(6):580-e718

Odreman-Macchioli, M., Vielma, S., Atchley, D., Comach, G., Ramirez, A., Perez, S., Tellez, L., Quintero, B., Hernandez, E., Munoz, M., Mendoza, J. (2013). Analysis of real-time pcr amplification efficiencies from three genomic regions of dengue virus. Investigacion Cientififica, 54(1):5-19

Hall, P.D., Weimert, N.A. , & Atchley, D.H. (2011). Function and Evaluation of the Immune System, In J.T. Dipiro (Ed.), Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiological Approach (pp. 1487 - 1504). New York: McGraw Hill.

Reiman, R.W., Atchley, D.H., & Voorhees, K.J. (2007). Indirect detection of Bacillus anthracis using real-time PCR to detect amplified gamma phage DNA. Journal of Microbiological Methods.

McAvin, J.C., Bowles, D.E., Swaby, J.A. , Blount, K. W. , Blow, J. A., Quintana, M., Hickman, J.R., Atchley, D.H., Niemeyer, D.M. (2005). Identification of Aedes aegypti and its Respective Life Stages by Real-time PCR. Military Medicine.

McAvin, J.C., Escamilla, E.M., Blow, J.A., Turell, M.J. , Quintana, M., Bowles,D.E., Swaby, J.A., Barnes, W.J., Huff, W.B., Lohman, Atchley, D.H., Hickman, J.R., Niemeyer, D.M. (2005). Rapid identification of dengue virus by RT-PCR using field-deployable instrumentation. Military Medicine.

Daum, L. T., Kruzelock, R.P., Ye, K., Hickman, J.R., Chambers, J.P., Barnes, W.J., Atchley, D.H. (2004). Comparison of taqman and epoch dark quencher hydrolysis probes during real-time reverse transcriptase pcr. Molecular and Cellular Probes.

McAvin, J.C., Morton, M.M., Roudabush, R., Atchley, D. H., & Hickman, J. R. (2004). Identification of Francisella tularensis using real-time fluorescence PCR. Military Medicine.

Azzimonti, F., Atchley, D.H., Morrison, C.A., Dodd, S., Boulton, D.W. , DeVane, C.L., Arnaud, P. (2003). One step purification of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein from human plasma. Fractionation of its polymorphic allele products. Journal of Chromatography B Analytical Technology Biomedical Life Science, 784, 33-38.

Virella, G.H., Thorpe, S., Alderson, N.L., Stephan, E.M., Atchley, D.H., Wagner, F., Lopes-Virella, M., and the DCCT/EDIC Research Group, (2003). Autoimmune response to advanced glycosylation end products of Human LDL. Journal of Lipid Research.

Anderson, F., Game, B., Atchley, D.H., Xu, M., Lopes-Virella, M., Huang, Y. (2002). IFN-gamma fusion toxin pretreatment augments immune complex-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in U937 histiocytes. Clinical Immunology.

Atchley, D. H., Lopes-Virella, M. F., Aheng, D., Kenny, D., & Virella, G. (2002). Oxidized LDL-anti-oxidized LDL immune complexes and diabetic nephropathy. Diabetologia.

Burnham, B. R., Atchley, D. H., Defusco, R. P. , Fowler, J., Darling, M. J. , Angulo, F.J. (2002). The use of enrofloxacin to prevent shedding of Salmonella from Green Iguanas, Iguana iguana. Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery, 12 (2), 10-13.

Virella, G., Atchley, D. H., Koskinen, S., Zheng, D., Lopes-Virella, M. F., DCCT/EDIC Research Group, (2002). Proatherogenic and proinflammatory properties of immune complexes prepared with purified human oxLDL Antibodies and human oxLDL. Clinical Immunology.

Hall, P., Virella, G., Willoughby, T., Atchley, D. H., Kreitman, R., Frankel, A. (2001). Antibody response to DT-GM during a phase I trial of patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Clinical Immunology.

Hirsch, I., Atchley, D. H., Tsai, E., Labbe, R., & Chait, A. (1998). Ascorbic acid clearance in diabetic nephropathy. Journal of Diabetes & its Complications.

Burnham, B., Atchley, D. H., DeFusco, R., Ferris, K., Zicarelli, J., Lee, J., Angulo, F. (1998). Prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms among captive green iguanas and potential public health implications. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Daniel Atchley, was born in San Manuel, Ariz., where he lived until emigrating to Western Australia when he was 12-years-old. After four years in the Aussie Outback, he moved to Okemah, Okla. to finish high school and went on to serve 21 years in the military, with three years as an U.S. Army Medical Laboratory Specialist, at Ft Hood, Texas; and 18 years as an U.S. Air Force Biomedical Sciences Corp Officer serving in various educational, research, clinical and advisory leadership roles. After retiring from the U.S. Air Force, Atchley served as an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and director of assessment at Harding University College of Pharmacy, Searcy, Ark., where he directed the college’s assessment efforts, taught basic medical sciences and conducted biomedical research. He came to Pikeville, KY in 2013, and currently serves as the associate dean for basic sciences and associate professor of microbiology and immunology, where his responsibilities include oversight of the preclinical didactic disciplines, teaching basic medical sciences and conducting biomedical research. Atchley enjoys hiking, Scuba diving, and spending time with family and friends. He, and his wife, Kim, also enjoy traveling, especially to visit their children and grandchildren in Charleston, S.C., and Searcy, Ark.

Teaching Philosophy: The best indicator of effective teaching is student learning. In order to accomplish this, a teacher should engage the student in an active learning environment that provides relevant and focused information, with real-world applications. Although I rely heavily on Power Point to keep me on track and guide classroom presentations, I believe students need active engagement strategies to maximize their learning. To this end, I emphasize transparent learning objectives that guide the students to what I expect them to know and do with the information presented and discussed in class. In a typical classroom session, I employ a healthy dose of direct and indirect questions (via an audience-response system) and provide students with fill-in-the blank note-takers to encourage at least a minimal level of participation. I utilize mnemonics to help students create mental pegs for complex information. For example, ‘ROME’ helps students sort through acid-base disorders. Respiratory disorders cause blood pH and pCO2 go opposite directions (respiratory is opposite), and metabolic disorders cause them to go equal directions (metabolic is equal). I have also found learning to be enhanced with periodic demonstrations (for kinesthetic learners), videos (accompanied by clear questions and objectives), in-class exercises, real life case studies, and group presentations. Most recently, I have been experimenting with team-based-learning to determine how to best utilize it inside and outside the classroom.





Felix M. Barker, II, O.D., M.S., FAAO, DPNAP

Professor of Optometry 

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
Telephone: 606.218.5523
E-mail: FelixBarker@upike.edu





Clinical Skills I: Basic Optometric Theory and Techniques
Clinical Skills II: Intermediate Optometric Theory and Techniques
Ophthalmic Surgery – Laser Procedures
Clinical Internship I: Introduction to Patient Care
Clinical Internship II
 

Doctor of Optometry
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.

Master of Science in Visual Science
University of Houston
Houston, Texas

Bachelor of Science in Optometry
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.
 

American Board of Medical Optometry

Fellow AAO, 1977
Distinguished Practitioner, National Academy of Practice 2007
 

Felix M. Barker, II O.D., M.S. is a part-time faculty member of the Kentucky College of Optometry. He is also a member of the medical staff of the W.G. Hefner VA Medical Center in Salisbury N.C., and is associate director of research of the DoD/VA Vision Center of Excellence. He is the former dean of research at Salus University and served as the interim dean of the college of optometry at Salus. He was the founding director of Salus's light and laser institute. His research interests include radiation effects upon the eye, ocular nutrition, TBI and clinical studies over a wide range of subjects.




Pierrette Dayhaw-Barker, Ph.D., FAAO

Professor of Optometry 

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
Telephone: 606.218.5523
E-mail: PierretteDayhawBarker@upike.edu





Medical Physiology

Doctor of Philosophy in Physiological Optics and Endocrinology
University of Houston
Houston, Texas

Bachelor of Arts (Pre-Med)
University of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

Professor Emeritus, Salus University
Distinguished Alumna, University of Houston
Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry
Onofrey Rybachock Educator of the year(1983)
 

Pierrette Dayhaw-Barker has taught medical physiology and endocrinology to optometry students and graduates for more than 30 years in the U.S. and internationally, including 11 countries in Europe and Asia. She also taught audiology and in a physician assistant program. Barker has held several administrative posts in optometry and was the founding dean for graduate programs in biomedicine. She is the author of numerous of journal articles, posters and presentations as well as a mentor to graduate students.




Mia Benedetti, Pharm.D.

Senior Instructor of Optometry

Office: Coal Building M10
Telephone: 606.218.5526
E-mail: MiaPowell@upike.edu

 


Pharmacology

University of Charleston School of Pharmacy (Charleston W.Va.)

Pharm D., Licensed pharmacist in the state of Ohio, Medication therapy management (MTM) certified, Immunization certified

Mia Powell, Pharm.D., is originally from the Elkhorn City area and a native to the Appalachian region. She graduated in 2009 from Pikeville College with a bachelor's degree in biology.  She received her doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy in 2014.  After graduation, she practiced as a retail pharmacist in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is certified in Medication Therapy Management (MTM) as well as certified to give immunizations. She joined the Kentucky College of Optometry in July 2016 and serves as a dual faculty member to the Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine as well. Her interests include designing unique clothing for sporting events, doing inspirational video blogs, interior design, flower gardening, traveling and sporting events.  God is her main focus in my life. But seek ye first the Kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you Matthew 6:33.




Boris Boyanovsky, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Anatomy

Office: Coal Building 815
Telephone: 606.218.5486
E-mail: BorisBoyanovsky@upike.edu




 

Neuroanatomy

ECFMG-certified physician

Assistant Professor
University of Pikeville, Department of Basic Sciences

Assistant Professor
University of Kentucky, Department of Internal Medicine
(2007-2012)

Research Associate
University of Kentucky, Department of Internal Medicine
(2005-2007)

Postdoctoral Scholar
University of Kentucky, Department of Internal Medicine
(2003-2005)

Postdoctoral Scholar
University of Kentucky, Department of Physiology
(2000-2003)

American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship (2003)

Award for scientific presentation
12th South Eastern Lipid Research Conference (2003)

Award for scientific presentation
Gill Heart Institute Cardiovascular Research Day (2004)

American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship (2005)

Young Investigator Travel Award
The 6th Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Meeting, DC (2005)

1. Boris B. Boyanovsky, William Bailey, Lauren Dixon and Nancy R. Webb Group V secretory phospholipase A2 enhancesthe progression of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms but confers protection against angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis in apoE-deficient mice. Am. J. Pathol. 2012 Sep; 181(3):1088-98.

2. Melissa Zack, Preetha Shridas, Boris B. Boyanovsky, William Bailey, Kathy Forrest, Deborah A. Howatt, Michael H. Gelb, Frederick C. de Beer, Alan Daugherty, and Nancy R. Webb Group X secretory phospholipase A2 augments Angiotensin II-induced inflammatory responses and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in apoE deficient mice. Atherosclerosis. 2011 Jan; 214(1):58-64. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

3. Preetha Shridas, William Bailey, Boris B. Boyanovsky, Rob C. Oslund, Michael H Gelb and Nancy R Webb. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Regulates the Expression of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) in Mouse Adrenals. J. Biol. Chem. 2010 Jun 25; 285(26):20031-9. Epub 2010 Apr 26.

4. Boris B. Boyanovsky, Xia Li, Preetha Shridas Manjula Sunkara, Andrew J Morris and Nancy R. Webb. Bioactive products generated by Group V sPLA2 hydrolysis of LDL activate macrophages to secrete proinflammatory cytokines. Cytokine. 2010 Apr; 50(1):50-7. Epub 2010 Feb 6.

5. Boris B. Boyanovsky, Melissa Zack, and Nancy R. Webb. The capacity of Group V sPLA2 to increase atherogenicity of apoE-/- and LDLR-/- mouse LDL in vitro predicts its atherogenic role in vivo. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2009 Apr. 29(4):532-538.

6. Gergana M. Deevska, Krassimira A. Rozenova, Natalia V. Giltiay, Melissa A. Chambers, James White, Boris B. Boyanovsky, Jia Wei, Alan Daugherty, Eric J. Smart, Michael B. Reid, Alfred H. Merrill, Jr., and Mariana Nikolova-Karakashian. Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency prevents diet-induced hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation and hyperglycemia in mice.J. Biol. Chem. 2009 Mar 27; 284(13):8359-68.

7. Boris B. Boyanovsky, Preetha Shridas, Michael Simons, Deneys R. van der Westhuyzen, and Nancy R. Webb. Syndecan-4 Mediates Macrophage Uptake of Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2-Modified Low Density Lipoprotein. Journal of Lipid Research, 2009; 50(4):641-50. Epub 2008.

8. Boris B.Boyanovsky, and Nancy R. Webb. Biology of Secretory Phospholipase A2. Review. Cardiovascular Drugs Ther. 2008 23(1):61-72. Epub 2008 Oct 14. Review.

9. Bing Sun,*Boris B. Boyanovsky, Margery A. Connelly, Preetha Shridas, Deneys R. van der Westhuyzen, Nancy R. Webb. Distinct Mechanisms for oxLDL Uptake and Cellular Trafficking by Class B Scavenger Receptors CD36 and SR-BI. Journal of Lipid Research.2007; 48(12):2560-70. Epub 2007 Sep 17. *BB and BS contributed equally to this work.

10. Meredith A. Bostrom,Boris B. Boyanovsky, Craig T. Jordan, Marilyn P. Wadsworth, Douglas J. Taatjes, Frederick C. de Beer, and Nancy R. Webb.Group V secretory phospholipase A2promotes atherosclerosis: Evidence from genetically altered mice. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2007Mar; 27(3):600-6.

11. Sathishkumar S, Boyanovsky B, Karakashian AA, Rozenova K, Giltiay NV, Kudrimoti M, Mohiuddin M, Ahmed MM, Nikolova-Karakashian M. Elevated Sphingomyelinase Activity and Ceramide Concentration in Serum of Patients Undergoing High Dose Spatially Fractionated Radiation Treatment: Implications for Endothelial Apoptosis. Cancer Biol Ther. 2005 Sep 13;4(9)

12. Boyanovsky BB, van der Westhuyzen DR, Webb NR. Group V sPLA2-modified LDL promotes foam cell formation by a SR-A and CD36 independent process that involves cellular proteoglycans. J Biol Chem. 2005 Sep 23;280(38):32746-52.

13. Wooton-Kee CR, Boyanovsky BB, Nasser MS, de Villiers WJ, Webb NR. Group V sPLA2 hydrolysis of low-density lipoprotein results in spontaneous particle aggregation and promotes macrophage foam cell formation. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2004 Apr;24(4):762-7.

14. Lightle S, Tosheva R, Lee A, Queen-Baker J, Boyanovsky B, Shedlofsky S, Nikolova-Karakashian M. Elevation of ceramide in serum lipoproteins during acute phase response in humans and mice: role of serine-palmitoyl transferase. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2003 Nov 15;419(2):120-8.

15. Boyanovsky B, Karakashian A, King K, Giltiay N, Nikolova-Karakashian M. Uptake and metabolism of low density lipoproteins with elevated ceramide content by human microvascular endothelial cells: implications for the regulation of apoptosis. J. Biol. Chem. 2003 Jul 18;278(29):26992-9. Epub 2003 Apr 29.

16. Boyanovsky B, Russeva M, Ganev V, Penev M, Baleva M. Prevalence of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 A variant in Bulgarian patients with pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2001 Dec;12(8):639-42.

17. Boianovski B, Ruseva M, Ganev V, Karag'ozova Zh, Mladenova A, Nikolov K, Baleva M, Dimitrova V, Chernev T, Ivanov S. Frequency of anti-phospholipid antibodies and Leiden mutation of hemostasis Factor V in unexplained recurrent fetal and embryo loss. Akush Ginekol (Sofia). 2001;40(3):11-14. Bulgarian.

18. B. Boyanovski, M. Russeva, GDobreva, VGanev, KNikolov, VPejcheva, MBaleva. “Protein C Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus” J. Clin. Rheumatol. 2000; 6(5): 239-243

19. Boyanovsky B, Baleva M, Nikolov K, Kolarov Z, Nikolova M. High levels of IgA anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Henoch-Schoenlein purpura, Sneddon's syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss. Thromb. Haemost. 1999 Dec;82(6):1774

Scientific monogram

20. Boyanovsky BB, Webb NR. (2009).Biology of secretory phospholipase A2, Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy




John Bradley, O.D., Ph.D.

Senior Instructor of Optometry


Office: Health Professions Education Building 401D
Telephone: 606.218.5531
E-mail: JohnBradley@upike.edu



 

OPT 514 Clinical Skills I (Lab)
OPT 611 Clinical Skills III (Lab)
OPT 615: Concepts of Monocular Vision and Visual Perception
 

Ph.D., Vision Science
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Doctor of Optometry
Interamerican University of Puerto Rico – School of Optometry

 Bachelor of Arts in Language (Spanish)
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

 

  • Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal (3 awards)
  • Air Force Commendation Medal
  • Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal
  • Air Force Achievement Medal
  • Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal
  • Interamerican University of Puerto Rico – School of Optometry Class of 2004 Valedictorian
  • Beta Sigma Kappa Optometric Society, Distinguished Graduate (2004)
  • Navy Health Services Collegiate Program (2001)

National Board of Examiners in Optometry
 

Bradley J. L., Reddix M. D., Irvin G., Horning, D. S. Low intensity Threat Protection for Navy Applications: GreenX. Laser Hardened Materials Program Review. Nov, 2016.
Bradley J. L., Guerin A., Pivneva I., Evans A. M., Stillman I. O., Dana R., Schaumberg D. A.  Estimates of incidence and prevalence of dry eye disease across age groups in the US using data from a large healthcare system. Paper presented at the American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting, Nov 2016.
Schaumberg D. A., Bradley J. L., Guerin A., Pivneva I., Evans A. M., Stillman I. O., Dana R.  Adherence and persistence with cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion for treatment of dry eye disease in a large US healthcare system. Poster presented at the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, Oct 2016.
Dana R., Bradley J. L., Guerin A., Pivneva I., Evans A. M., Stillman I. O., Schaumberg D. A. Incidence and prevalence of dry eye disease in a large US healthcare system across all ages. Poster presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting, Oct 2016.
Reddix, M. D., Irvin, G., Bradley, J. L., & Tapia, M. L. Mitigating Less-than-Lethal Laser Effects in USCG Night Operating Environments.  Paper presented at the XXXIII Lasers on the Modern Battlefield Technical Exchange Meeting, Joint Base San Antonio, Ft. Sam Houston, TX, Mar 2016.
Bradley, J. L., Reddix, M. D., Folga, R., & Tapia, M. Laser-Pointer Illumination Events in Naval Aviation Operations.  Paper presented at the Aerospace Medical Association 86th Annual Scientific Meeting, May 2015.
Reddix MD, Irvin G, Bradley JL, Folga RV. Mitigating Less-than-Lethal Laser Effects in Night Operating Environments. Laser Hardened Materials Program Review. Oct, 2014.
Bradley J. L., Edwards C. S., Fullard R. J. Adaptation of Impression Cytology to Enable Conjunctival Surface Cell Transcriptome Analysis. Curr Eye Res. 2013.
Kehinde L., Bradley J., Fullard R. Tear Levels of Colony Stimulating Factors and Conjunctival Surface Expression of Inflammatory Biomarkers in Normal and Dry Eye Patients. Poster presented at the American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting, Oct 2013.
Guyette N., Williams L., Tran M., Than T., Bradley J., et al. Comparison of Low-Abundance Biomarker Levels in Capillary-Collected Nonstimulated Tears and Washout Tears of Aqueous-Deficient and Normal Patients. IOVS, 2013.

Before moving to Pikeville, John Bradley, Ph.D., was an optometrist in the United States Navy and conducted joint aeromedical research at the Naval Medical Research Unit – Dayton (NAMRU-D) at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. His research included color vision screening exams, laser eye protection, incidence and prevalence of dry eye, and human performance under pharmacologically induced miotic (pupil constriction) conditions. His previous Ph.D. research involved the study of biomarkers and genetic expression involved in inflammatory ocular surface disease.
Bradley was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa ,and later moved to Niceville, Fla. After graduating from Niceville High School he attended Brigham Young University for one year before serving a mission for his church in Bahia Blanca, Argentina. After a two-year mission, he returned to BYU to continue his studies during which time he joined the Air Force ROTC. He graduated in 1996 and was commissioned as a personnel officer in the Unites States Air Force. His initial assignment was as Chief, Customer Support, Military Personnel Flight at the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan Air Base, Korea. Other assignments included:  Squadron Section Commander, 40th Flight Test Squadron and later as the Executive Officer, 46th Operations Group at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. In 2000, he was promoted to Captain and transitioned to the Puerto Rico Air National Guard to attend Optometry School at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico. While an optometry student, he was selected for the Navy Health Services Collegiate Program.
Bradley graduated Summa Cum Laude from the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry in 2004 and was assigned as the Optometry Department Head at the US Naval Hospital Pensacola, Florida. In 2007, he transferred to the Naval Branch Health Clinic, Iwakuni Marine Corps Air Station, Japan, where he was the Department Head, Clinical Support Services. After 3 years in Birmingham and before reporting to NAMRU-D, he studied at the Naval Aerospace Medicine Institute, Pensacola, Fla., where he earned his wings as an Aerospace Optometrist.




Cliff Caudill, O.D.

Assistant Dean of Clinical Affairs
Assistant Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 501E
Telephone: 606.218.5515
E-mail: CliffCaudill@upike.edu



 

Microbiology/Immunology
Clinical Skills I, II, III, IV (Lab)
Ophthalmic Surgery I: Laser Surgery (Lab)
Ophthalmic Surgery II: Injections, and Periocular Procedures (Lab)
 

Doctor of Optometry
University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry
Birmingham, Ala.

Residency in Primary Care Optometry
Northeastern State University College of Optometry
Tahlequah, Okla.

Bachelor of Science in Biology
University of Kentucky
Lexington, Ky.
 

  • Achieved Board Certification in Medical Optometry 2013
  • Inaugural Chair, Academic Medical Center Optometrists (AMCO), American Academy of Optometry
  • Committee member, American Optometric Association online Anterior Segment Image Catalog 2013
  • Served on the National Board of Examiners Continuing Competency Examination Development committee including submission and review of proposed test items, 2012
  • ACOE accreditation site visit, served as site visit consultant for re-accreditation, W.G (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury, NC, 2011
  • Advisor, Kentucky Optometric Association Laser/Minor Surgical Procedures Task Force, 2011
  • National Board of Examiners in Optometry, Clinical Skills Examiner
  • ACOE accreditation site visit, served as site visit consultant for re-accreditation, Cleveland VAMC, December 2009
  • Consultant, Accreditation Council on Optometric Education, 2008
  • Fellow, American Academy of Optometry, 2004
  • Injectable Medications and Minor Surgical Procedures in Primary Eye Care, Alabama Optometric Association and Northeastern State University College of Optometry, January, 1996.
  • Laser Therapy for the Anterior Segment Certification, TLC (Tulsa) and NSU College of Optometry, October 1995.
  • Certificate in Treatment and Management of Ocular Disease, Intl. Association of Boards of Examiners in Optometry, 1994.
  • National Board of Examiners in Optometry

VSP Outstanding Clinician Scholarship Award, Third Professional Year
Beta Sigma Kappa Optometric Honor Fraternity, First-Fourth Professional Years
 

A Lexington Ky., native, Cliff Caudill, O.D., received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Kentucky and later his Doctorate of Optometry from the University of Alabama Birmingham School of Optometry. He went on to complete a residency in Primary Care Optometry at the Northeastern State University College of Optometry. Caudill most recently served 12 years as an assistant professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences providing primary eye care and supervision of the department’s optometric education program. In this role, he implemented and directed the accredited optometry residency program and served as a clinical preceptor for students completing external rotations in the area of ocular disease. Caudill hopes his experience training optometrists at an academic medical center will be invaluable in creating a clinical curriculum for the Kentucky College of Optometry. He will be responsible for the development of the clinical educational curriculum and the establishment of rural clinic partnerships with existing Federally Qualified Health Centers in order to establish optometric training venues that will provide care to the underserved of rural Appalachia.




Kendall J Cecil, O.D.

Senior Instructor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
Telephone: 606.218.5523
E-mail: KendallCecil@upike.edu




Jerald Combs, O.D.

Assistant Professor of Optometry 

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
Telephone: 606.218.5523
E-mail: JeraldCombs@upike.edu




Joshua Crum, D.O.

Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs for KYCOM

Office: Coal Building 611
Telephone: 606.218.5428
E-mail: JoshuaCrum@upike.edu


Diagnostic Radiology Residency
Grandview Medical Center, Dayton, Ohio

Internship/Internal Medicine Residency
Norton Community Hospital, Norton, Virginia

Doctor of Osteopathy
Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine

Major Biology, Minor Chemistry
Pikeville College
 

Aug 2010 - Present:
Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs
Teaching Faculty
Assistant Professor of Family Medicine
University of Pikeville
Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine
Pikeville, Kentucky

July 2009 - Present:
Diagnostic Radiologist
Norton, Virginia and Pikeville, Kentucky

April 2009 - June 2009:
State Licensure preparation and obtaining hospital credentialing

July 2008 - March 2009:
Radiologist
Highlands Regional Hospital
Prestonsburg, Kentucky

July 15, 2008: American Osteopathic Board of Radiology
Diagnostic Radiology

Licenses
July 2009 - Present: Virginia License # 0102202435 Active
April 2008 - Present: Kentucky License # 03117 Active
October 2005 - April 2009: Ohio License # 34.008659 Inactive
October 2004 - June 2006: Ohio DO Training Certificate License # 58.001656 Inactive



Gergana Deevska, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Office: Coal Building 716
Telephone: 606.218.5426
E-mail: GerganaDeevska@upike.edu



 

Principles of Biology I
Introduction to Biology Laboratory
Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

Postdoctoral training
Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky
Lexington, Ky.

Ph.D. in Biochemistry
Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Sofia, Bulgaria

M.Sc. and B.Sc. in Molecular Biology
(with major in Virology)
Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”
Sofia, Bulgaria

Gergana Deevska, Ph.D., is a native of Bulgaria. She joined the KYCOM faculty in July 2016 after completing her postdoctoral training at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her research expertise is in the area of lipid metabolism and signaling and their role in the Metabolic Syndrome-related pathologies (obesity, diabetes, CVD etc.). She enjoys outdoors and various sport activities including hiking, swimming and group exercise classes, as well as cooking and spending time with her husband, Mike Mitov, and their two kids.

2015-to date ASBMB Education Fellow appointment

2015 Session Chair at the 50th SERLC, Cashiers, N.C.

2014 FASEB-MARC Travel Award

2013 Postdoctoral Travel Award for best poster presentation at the 48th SERLC, Cashiers, N.C.

2013 ASBMB Postdoctoral Fellow Travel Award to attend the EB meeting, Boston, Ma.

2011-2013 American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship Award

1.) Zhang, L., Kline., RH IV, Deevska, G., Ma, F., Nikolova-Karakashian, M. and Westlund-High, K. Alcohol and High Fat Induced Chronic Pancreatitis: TRPV4 Antagonist Reduces Hypersensitivity. 2015. Neuroscience. E-pub ahead of print: doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.10.028.

2.) Deevska, G., Sunkara, M., Karakashian, C., Peppers, B., Morris, A. and Nikolova-Karakashian, M. Effect of Procysteine on Aging-associated changes in hepatic GSH and SMase: Evidence for Transcriptional Regulation of Smpd3. 2014. J Lipid Res. Oct; 55(10):2041-52.

3.) Moylan, J., Stasko, S., Smith, J., Deevska, G

., Wolf, E., McLean, J., Bonnel, M., Nikolova-Karakashian, M., and Reid, M. Neutral Sphingomyelinase-3 is essential for TNF-stimulated redox signaling in skeletal muscle. 2014. Redox Biol. Jul 30;2:910-20.

4.) Empinado, H., Deevska, G., Nikolova-Karakashian, M., Yoo, J., Christou, D., Ferreira, L., Heart failure-induced diaphragm weakness and fatigue are accompanied by increased diaphragm neutral sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide content. 2014. Eur. J. Heart Fail. May;16 (5):519-25.

5.) Deevska, G., Sunkara, M., Morris, A., J. and Nikolova-Karakashian, M. Characterization of Secretory Sphingomyelinase Activity, Lipoprotein Sphingolipid Content and LDL aggregation in ldlr-/- mice fed high fat diet. 2012. Biosci Rep., 32(5):479-90.

6.) Rozenova, K., Deevska, G., Nikolova-Karakashian, M. Studies on the Role of Acid Sphingomyelinase and Ceramide in the regulation of TACE activity and TNFα secretion in macrophages. 2010. J Biol Chem. 285 (27): 21103-13.

7.) Deevska, G. and Nikolova-Karakashian M. The twists and turns of sphingolipid pathway in glucose regulation. 2010. Biochimie, 93(1): 32-8.

8.) Deevska, G., Rozenova, K., Giltiay, N., Chambers, M., White, J., Boyanovsky, B., Wei, J., Daugherty, A., Smart, E., Reid, M., Merrill, A.H. Jr., and Nikolova-Karakashian, M. Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency Prevents Diet-induced Hepatic Triacylglycerol Accumulation and Hyperglycemia in Mice. 2009. J Biol Chem. 284(13): 8359-68.



Donald J. Egan, O.D., FAAO

Director of Contact Lens

Professor of Optometry



Office: Health Professions Education Building 501F
Telephone: 606.218.5513
E-mail:  DonaldEgan@upike.edu




Basic Contact Lenses
Advanced Contact Lenses
 

Doctor of Optometry
Pennsylvania College of Optometry (Salus University)
Philadelphia, Pa.

Residency in Clinical Optometry with an Emphasis in Contact Lenses
University of Waterloo School of Optometry
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Bachelor of Science in Biology
St John’s University
Jamaica, Queens, N.Y.
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

Faculty Instructor of the Year, Western University of Health Sciences College of Optometry, 2014
Clerkships – Highest Scores in Student Feedback Award Western University of Health Sciences College of Optometry, 2013
California Optometric Association Educator of the Year Award, 2011
Optometry Heroes Award Western University of Health Sciences College of Optometry, 2011
Faculty Instructor of the Year Award University of Missouri School of Optometry, 1989
Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, 1979

Donald Egan, O.D., joined UPIKE Kentucky College of Optometry from Southern California where he was the course leader for the contact lens curriculum at the Western University of Health Sciences College of Optometry. He received his Doctor of Optometry degree from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and also completed a contact lens residency at the University of Waterloo School of Optometry after which he continued as a member of their contact lens faculty. Subsequently, he joined the faculty in St. Louis to develop the contact lens program for the newly established school of optometry at the University of Missouri as well as one for the St Louis University School of Medicine Department of Ophthalmology. While a tenured faculty member at UM-St. Louis, he also served as a voting member of the FDA’s Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Egan continued his passion for teaching as a hospital-based optometrist at the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa., instructing both ophthalmology residents and technical staff before moving to California and later Kentucky. His current position is professor of optometry and associate dean of academic affairs. His career includes more than 100 professional publications, posters and speaking engagements. He has had the opportunity to also volunteer for optometric services in Haiti, Jamaica and at Remote Access Medicine clinics in the United States. He will be teaching the basic contact lens and advanced contact lens courses.




Rachel Fitzgerald, O.D.

Senior Instructor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 501C
Telephone: 606.218.5532
E-mail: Rachelfitzgeral@upike.edu





 

Clinical Internship
Ocular Motility
Binocular Vision
Strabismus, Amblyopia, and Oculomotor Rehabilitation
Pediatric Optometry

Residency, Pediatric Optometry and Binocular Vision
Indiana University School of Optometry, Bloomington, Ind.

Doctor of Optometry
University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry, Birmingham, Ala.

Bachelors of Science, Nutrition Science
University of Georgia, Athens, Ga.

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

COVD Travel Grant Recipient (2017)
Beta Sigma Kappa Optometric Society, Distinguished Graduate (2016)
Clark F. Amos Scholarship Recipient (2016)

Rachel Fitzgerald, O.D., is originally from the suburbs of Atlanta, Ga. She graduated from the University of Georgia in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in nutrition science and received her Doctorate of Optometry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry in 2016. After graduation, she completed a residency in pediatric optometry and binocular vision at Indiana University School of Optometry where she received advanced training in the treatment of pediatric conditions such as strabismus and amblyopia along with vision therapy and visual information processing. During this time, she also advised optometry students in both clinic and lecture and looks forward to working with KYCO students.  Fitzgerald lives in the Pikeville area and enjoys hiking, traveling, and cheering for the Georgia Bulldogs and Atlanta Falcons.



Steven R. Harris, Ph.D.

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Professor of Pharmacology & Physiology
 

Office: Coal Building 303
Telephone: 606.218.5422
E-mail: StevenHarris@upike.edu





Biochemistry
Histology
Human Physiology
Medical Pharmacology
Molecular Pharmacology
Physiology


Postdoctoral Training
National Cancer Institute

Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology & Toxicology
University of Georgia

Masters of Science in Pharmacology & Toxicology
Auburn University

Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Chemistry
LaGrange College

Staff Member of the Year, Pikeville College School of Osteopathic Medicine, 2008
Teaching Excellence Award, Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine, 1999-2015
SAA Award for Outstanding Support, Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015
Administrator of the Year, Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2003-2005

Dr. Harris was born in North Carolina but lived most of his life in Georgia. Following postdoctoral training at the National Cancer Institute, he moved to Pikeville in 1998 to organize and teach the medical pharmacology course at KYCOM. Since that time he has taken on administrative responsibilities as associate dean for Basic Sciences from 2002-2008, and as associate dean for Academic Affairs from 2008-present. He enjoys various sports activities including golf, football, baseball and basketball, as well as spending time with his wife, Barbara, and kids.




Adam Hickenbotham, O.D., MPH, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 501J
Telephone: 606.218.5522
E-mail: AdamHickenbotham@upike.edu





Principles of Geometric Optics
Optics of the Eye and Clinical Implications
Ocular Physiology
Ocular Anatomy
Epidemiology
Ophthalmic Surgery – Laser Procedures

Ph.D. in Bioengineering
Joint Graduate Program of University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Francisco

Doctoral Degree in Optometry
University of California, Berkeley

Masters in Public Health (Epidemiology)
University of California, Berkeley

Bachelor's degree in Psychology
Brigham Young University

National Board of Examiners in Optometry
Clinical Research Conduct and Management Certification Program - University of California, Berkeley
Anterior Segment Laser Certification – State of Oklahoma
Certified ISO Internal Auditor (International Organization of Standards)

Honors Distinction awarded during graduation from Joint Ph.D. Program of Bioengineering between University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Francisco

Honors Distinction awarded during graduation from University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health

Honors Distinction awarded during graduation from University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry

Hickenbotham, A, Vesper R, & Miles, T. “Light Scatter and Contrast Sensitivity Measurements after Corneal Refractive Procedures with VDT Glare Testing” - Doctoral Thesis at University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry - Nominated for 2003 AAO Nuemueller Award

Honors recognition given by contact lens and binocular vision clinics at the University of California, Meridith Morgan Eye Center

Honors recognition given by the Peking Medical University Hospital in Beijing, China

Honors recognition given by Sacramento Veterans Administration Hospital

Honors recognition given by Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital and Palo Alto Society for the Blind

Graduated Magna Cum Laude from Brigham Young University

Hickenbotham, A, Roorda, A (2012) The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods. Ph.D. Dissertation for Joint Graduate Program in Bioengineering from University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, San Francisco. http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/etd/ucb/text/Hickenbotham_berkeley_0028E_12626.pdf

Hickenbotham, A, Roorda, A, Steinmaus, C, & Glasser, A. Meta-analysis of the Sex Differences in Presbyopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. published 24 April 2012, 10.1167/iovs.12-9791 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383187/pdf/i1552-5783-53-6-3215.pdf

Hickenbotham, A, Roorda, A. (2012) Comparing Visual Performance of Spherical Aberration and Small Pupil Aperture Profiles in Improving Measured Depth of Focus. Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3511607/pdf/nihms411534.pdf

Adam Hickenbotham, O.D., MPH, Ph.D., has been a licensed optometrist since 2003 with clinical experience in hospitals and ophthalmology centers in China, Thailand and the Philippines as well as refractive surgery clinics in California’s San Francisco Bay Area. He has published scientific research articles in peer-reviewed medical journals and frequently gives lectures at research conferences throughout the U.S. and internationally.

Hickenbotham completed the NIH-sponsored Berkeley Clinical Scientist Development program as a member of the Berkeley Adaptive Optics Laboratory where he studied the effect of higher order aberrations on depth of focus and high and low contrast visual acuity. His Ph.D. dissertation was titled “The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods.”

In 2012, Hickenbotham founded ThruFocus Optics, LLC, an ophthalmic laser medical device research company that is currently performing human clinical trials internationally using an innovative new method of laser eye surgery called Laser PM®. Laser PM® reduces the effects of presbyopia as well as improves the results of refractive surgery by utilizing a patented laser system that was developed by Hickenbotham.




Keith Ison, D.O., F.A.O.C.O.

Senior Clinical Instructor

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
E-mail: KeithIson@upike.edu





Ophthalmology Residency, Kettering Medical Center/Grandview Hospital, Dayton, Ohio Subspecialty rotations performed at Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio
Completed 7-week Pre-Residency training course/Lancaster Ophthalmology course through Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary at Colby College
Rotating Internship, Kettering Medical Center/Grandview Hospital, Dayton, Ohio
Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Pikeville- KYCOM, Pikeville, Kentucky
B.S. Biology/Minor Chemistry, Pikeville College, Pikeville, Kentucky
Completed Mini-fellowship in LASIK surgery at The Cleveland Clinic, Cole Eye Institute with Dr. Ronald Krueger
Certified on Allegretto Wave Eye-Q Excimer laser as well as the FS200 Femtosecond laser
Completed Practical Statistics Without Tears for the Clinician course, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
Attended 7 Week Lancaster Ophthalmology Review Course, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Colby College, Waterville, Maine
Attended Brooks Army Medical Center Ophthalmology Board Review Course, San Antonio, Texas

September, 2012 Began performing LASIK/Refractive laser eye surgery as an added service to my current practice.
10/2011-Present Currently employed by Pikeville Medical Center and in charge of comprehensive Ophthalmology physician practice.
In private practice partnership from 8/2006 to 10/2011.
Perform Approximately 800 Cataract surgeries along with 100 general cosmetic/plastic eyelid procedures per year.

Selected for Inclusion in The Empire Who’s Who Among Executives and Professionals in Healthcare, representing Miamisburg, Ohio, 2006
Scored 91st Percentile National Medical Boards(NBOME), 2000
Graduated Magna Cum Laude, 1998
Appalachian Honors Scholarship Recipient, 1994-1998
Member of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges 1994 - 1998
Appeared on Dean’s List 1994 - 1998

American Academy of Ophthalmology
American Osteopathic College of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons
American Osteopathic Association
Christian Medical and Dental Society
Kentucky Medical Association
Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons

Completed Paper on: A Case Report of An Unusual Presentation of Behcet’s Disease in a Caucasian Male
Currently Hold Kentucky Medical License Certified by American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery – 2007
Adjunct Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine at the University of Pikeville – 2007
Awarded Fellow of American Osteopathic College of Ophthalmology- Head and Neck Surgery- May 2013
Assistant Clinical Professor at Kentucky College of Optometry- May 2017

Case Presentation of the Miller Fisher Syndrome, In Association with the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Eye Institute Faculty
Completed Paper on: A Case Report of An Unusual Presentation of Behcet’s Disease in a Caucasian Male



Eilene Eugenio Kinzer, O.D., M.Ed. VFL, FAAO

Assistant Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 401G
Telephone: 606.218.5514
E-mail: EileneKinzer@upike.edu





OPT 514 Basic Optometric Theory and Techniques I
OPT 524 Basic Optometric Theory and Techniques II
OPT 526 Ocular Anatomy
OPT 528 Neuroanatomy and Neurosciences
OPT 611 Clinical Skills III Advanced Optometric Theory and Techniques Refractive Management and Ocular Health Assessment
OPT 614 Ocular Motility
OPT 616 Ocular Physiology and Biochemistry
OPT 621 Clinical Skills IV: Advanced Preclinical Optometry
OPT 625 Anterior Segment Disease
OPT 628 Posterior Segment Disease I
 

Doctor of Optometry
Pacific University College of Optometry
Forest Grove, Ore., 2012

Master of Education, Visual Function in Learning
Pacific University College of Optometry
Forest Grove, Ore., 2011

Bachelor of Science in Biology
Metropolitan State College of Denver
Denver, Colo., 2008
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, 2013
Brian Hill Award for Service and Leadership, 2012
Optometric Physicians of Washington’s Student of the Year, 2012
 

Eilene Kinzer is a native of Kent, Wash.. Prior to her appointment at the Kentucky College of Optometry, she was a practicing optometrist in Grundy, Va. Kinzer completed a post doctorate residency program in advanced ocular diseases at Indiana University School of Optometry. During her residency, she advised optometry students in clinic and presented posterior segment ocular disease lectures. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and sits on the Academy's Membership Committee. Kinzer has a passion for providing eye care services in areas of need across the United States, including serving as vision director for Remote Area Medical Seattle, and in other countries through Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity including Honduras, Costa Rica and Mexico. During her free time, she and her husband enjoy traveling, attending plays and concerts, spending time with their dog Gypsie and reading on the porch.




Jesson Martin Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 401C
Telephone: 606.218.5524
E-mail: JessonMartin@upike.edu





Principles of Geometric and Physical Optics
Optics of the Eye
Fundamentals of Vision Science

Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Indiana University School of Optometry

Post-Doctoral Fellow
The Eye Institute - Medical College of Wisconsin

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Physics
National Institute of Technology (NITT) - Bharathidasan University
Tiruchirappalli, India

Master of Philosophy in Physics
Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India

Master of Science in Physics
Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India

Bachelor of Science in Physics
Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India

Jesson Martin, Balamurali Vasudevan, Nikole L Himebaugh, Arthur Bradley, Larry N Thibos, “Unbiased Estimation of Refractive State of Aberrated Eyes,” Vision Research 51 (2011), pp. 1932-1940.

Norberto Lopez-Gil, Jesson Martin, Tao Liu, Arthur Bradley, David Diaz-Munoz, Larry N. Thibos., “Retinal Image Quality during Accommodation.” Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics 33, pp.497-507, 2013.

Elected to serve as the co-chair of the Optical Metrology Technical Committee of the Optical Society of America (OSA) 2014 -16.

Served in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Optics sub-committee member on Intraocular lens (IOL) standards 2015-16.

Recipient of Alcon’s Outstanding Achievement Award for Technology Innovation for 2013, an Alcon Global award.

Recipient of the International Society for Optical Engineering’s (SPIE) Educational Scholarship in Optical Science and Engineering in 2006 for potential long-range contributions to the field of optics, photonics and related disciplines.

Recipient of Optical Society of America’s (OSA) Travel Award for 2005 Frontiers in Optics (FiO) conference held at Tucson, Ariz.

Jesson Martin completed his Ph.D. in physics from the National Institute of Technology (NITT), India, in 2007. After completion of his doctorate, Martin worked as a post-doctoral researcher (2007-2008) at the Eye Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin, specializing in the fields of adaptive optics retinal imaging and color vision. He continued his post-doctoral research (2008-2012) at the Indiana University School of Optometry specializing in the field of physiological optics. His research interest has been in the understanding of the optics of the human eye and visual performance. He has been working on developing objective techniques to accurately measure and quantify refraction, accommodation and other subjective optometric evaluation methods. He has extensive experience in the development and operations of various ophthalmic instruments, such as human eye aberrometers and high resolution retinal cameras. 

Martin joins KYCO after several years of industry research and development experience at major  surgical intraocular lens companies, including Bausch & Lomb and Alcon. At these companies, he served as a senior optical engineer, where he was involved in the development and metrology of surgical intraocular lens products.

Martin has also taught physics for more than five years prior to his Ph.D. program. He will be teaching courses on geometric and physical optics, physiological optics and fundamental of vision science.

Martin is a recipient of Alcon’s Outstanding Achievement Award for Technology Innovation for 2013, an Alcon Global award. He is also a recipient of the International Society for Optical Engineering’s (SPIE) Educational Scholarship in Optical Science and Engineering in 2006 for potential long-range contributions to the field of optics, photonics and related disciplines.

He is currently elected to serve as the co-chair of the Optical Metrology Technical Committee of the Optical Society of America (OSA) 2014 to 2016. Martin is also a reviewer for several peer reviewed optics journals.




Ian McWherter, O.D., FAAO

Director of Research
Assistant Professor of Optometry,


Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
Telephone: 606.218.5523
E-mail: IanMcWherter@upike.edu




Ophthalmic Surgery – I-Laser Procedures
Research Methodology
Ophthalmic Surgery II – Injections and Periocular Surgery
 

Doctor of Optometry
Pennsylvania College of Optometry at SALUS
Elkins Park, Pa.

Residency – Ocular Disease
Bennett and Bloom Eye Care Centers
Louisville, Ky.

Bachelor of Science in Biology, Summa Cum Laude
University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown
Johnstown, Pa.
 

National Board of Examiners in Optometry
American Board of Optometry

Best in Class 2012, Vision Monday
Dr. Arthur Shlaifer Memorial Award
Clinical Excellence in Module 1 Primary Care
Alumni Association Award
First Place, Varilux Optometry Student Bowl, Salt Lake City, Utah

Ian W. McWherter O.D., a consultative optometrist, graduated from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University in Philadelphia, Pa., with highest honors in May 2012. McWherter completed rotations at Veterans’ hospitals in Charleston, S.C., and Muskogee, Okla., as well as private practices in Fairfax, Va., and Savannah, Ga. In 2012, he was accepted to the Bennett & Bloom Eye Centers Optometric Residency program. Upon completion of his residency, McWherter practiced optometry in the Kentuckiana area.

Among his many academic honors and achievements, McWherter was named “Best in Class 2012” by “Vision Monday,” an optometric journal, for being a top student at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. Additionally, he has been actively involved in many volunteer and charitable organizations, including the Lions Club and serving as the student member to the Board of Trustees at his university. In 2011, he won first place in the Varilux Optometry Student Bowl in Salt Lake City, Utah – an academic challenge against students from other optometry schools across the country.

Upon acceptance into the Bennett & Bloom Eye Centers optometric residency program, McWherter received the Optometric Residency Matching Service’s Scholarship for obtaining one of the top four scores on the National Optometry Boards in his residency class. He has also received several other awards including the Alumni Association Award, membership in the Gold Key International Optometric Honor Society, the Clinical Excellence Citation and the Beta Sigma Kappa Award.

McWherter is a member of the Greater Louisville Optometric Society, the Kentucky Optometric Association and the American Optometric Association.




Gregory Moore, O.D.

Assistant Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 401E
Telephone: 606.218.5518
E-mail: GregoryMoore@upike.edu





Methods 1 lab
Methods 2 lecture and lab
Methods 3 lecture and lab
Methods 4 lecture and lab

Bachelor of Science
West Virginia State University

Doctor of Optometry
Southern College of Optometry

Certified by the KYBO for full scope including providing minor surgical procedures, SLT, Yag Cap, and YAG PI laser surgeries.

Granted Hospital Privileges by the Pikeville Medical Center in July 2016.

Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Saving Certifications from the American Red Cross.

Outstanding Service Award by the West Virginia Association of Optometric Physicians.
Was granted by Governor Steven L. Beshear and the Commonwealth of Kentucky the commission of Kentucky Colonel.
Served two terms as President of the West Virginia Board of Optometry.
In June 2016, Moore was elected President of the Association of Regulatory Boards of Optometry

Moore has been considered an industry thought leader and has been a lecturer for the largest ophthalmic pharmaceutical and ophthalmic surgical companies in the world. He has been quoted in countless publications throughout his career, most notably he was quoted nine times in the textbook refractive surgical series “LASEK, PRK, and Excimer LASER STROMAL SURFACE ABLATION” edited by Dimitri Azar. M.D., Massimo Camellin M.D., and Richard W. Yee M.D. published by Harvard Press

Moore has lectured on four continents during both optometric and ophthalmology continuing education meetings as well as at various schools or colleges of optometry and medicine.

Moore’s most recent publication was published May 15, 2016, in the Review of Optometry
“Tools of the Trade: Current Techniques to Treat Meibomian Gland Dysfunction”

Moore was recently named to the peer review editorial board of BMC Ophthalmology

As a result of his inventions an developments in optometry Moore holds numerous patent and patent pending.

Moore lives in Charleston W.Va., where he maintains a private practice in addition to his duties at KYCO. He is the proud father of Sydney Ann who is starting her senior year at Charleston Catholic High School and is on the school's soccer team which has won the last two West Virginia A-AA State women’s soccer championships. When not following his daughters sporting activities, Moore pursues his hobbies as an advanced SCUBA certificated diver and as a private pilot.




Josephine Owoeye, O.D., MPH, FAAO

Director of Personal & Professional Development
Associate Professor of Optometry


Office: Health Professions Education Building 501H
Telephone: 606.218.5525
E-mail: JosephineOwoeye@upike.edu





Clinical Skills I, II, III, IV (lab)
Ocular motility
Binocular Vision
Strabismus, Amblyopia & Oculomotor Rehabilitation
Pediatric Optometry

Master of Public Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD

Residency, Binocular Vision and Pediatric Optometry
Pennsylvania College of Optometry, Philadelphia, PA

Doctor of Optometry
Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University, Philadelphia, PA

Bachelors of Science, Visual Sciences
Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University, Philadelphia, PA

Bachelors of Science, Biology, Psychology
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

National Board of Examiners in Optometry

University of California, Berkeley Translational Research Travel Grant 2011
American Academy of Optometry Travel Grant (Texas) 2003
Clinical Excellence Honor Citation in Pediatrics 2003
National Optometric Association Travel Grant (Jamaica) 2002
Professional Practice Clinical Honors 2002

1. Repka MX, Friedman DS, Katz J, Ibironke J, Giordano L, Tielsch JM. The prevalence of ocular structural disorders and nystagmus among preschool-aged children. J AAPOS 2012; 16(2): 182-4
2. Ibironke J. Microtropia: Clinical Findings and Management for the Primary Eye Care
Physician. Optometry 2011; 82(11): 657-61.
3. McKean-Cowdin R, Varma R, Cotter SA, Tarczy-Hornoch K, Borchert MS, Lin JH, Wen
G, Azen SP, Torres M, Tielsch JM, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Katz J, Ibironke J, Giordano L; Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study Groups. Risk factors for astigmatism in preschool children: the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease and Baltimore pediatric eye disease studies. Ophthalmology 2011; 118(10): 1974-81.
4. Cotter SA, Varma R, Tarczy-Hornoch K, McKean-Cowdin R, Lin J, Wen G, Wei J, Borchert M, Azen SP, Torres M, Tielsch JM, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Katz J, Ibironke J, Giordano L; Joint Writing Committee for the Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study Groups. Risk factors associated with childhood strabismus: the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease and Baltimore pediatric eye disease studies. Ophthalmology 2011; 118(11): 2251-61.
5. Borchert MS, Varma R, Cotter SA, Tarczy-Hornoch K, McKean-Cowdin R, Lin JH, Wen G, Azen SP, Torres M, Tielsch JM, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Katz J, Ibironke J, Giordano L; Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study Groups. Risk factors for hyperopia and myopia in preschool children the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease and Baltimore pediatric eye disease studies. Ophthalmology 2011; 118(10): 1966-73.
6. Tarczy-Hornoch K, Varma R, Cotter SA, McKean-Cowdin R, Lin JH, Borchert MS, Torres M, Wen G, Azen SP, Tielsch JM, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Katz J, Ibironke J, Giordano L; Joint Writing Committee for the Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study Groups. Risk factors for decreased visual acuity in preschool children: the multi-ethnic pediatric eye disease and Baltimore pediatric eye disease studies. Ophthalmology 2011; 118(11): 2262-73.
7. Ibironke J, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Katz J, Giordano L, Hawse P, Tielsch JM. Child
Development and Refractive Error in Preschool Children: The Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study. Optometry and Vision Science 2011; 88(2): 181-7.

Before moving to Pikeville, Josephine O. Owoeye, O.D., MPH, was an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore for almost 12 years. She completed a residency training in pediatric optometry at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry (Salus University), earned a Master of Public Health degree at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is a fellow in the American Academy of Optometry.

Owoeye has dedicated her career to research and clinical activities that focus on preventable blindness in children. At the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, her clinic specialized in the treatment of refractive errors and amblyopia, and assisting in the management of strabismus cases in children and adults. Her expertise also included performing comprehensive eye examinations for children with special needs.

She served as an investigator on the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study (BPEDS), an NIH funded study to determine the prevalence of eye disease in preschool children in Baltimore. She was also an investigator on the Baltimore Reading and Eyes Disease Study (BREDS) that was conducted to determine the associations between reading difficulties and uncorrected vision problems in children.

Owoeye successfully served as a vision consultant for the Baltimore City Health Department. She helped overhaul their vision screening protocols in Baltimore City schools and also served on the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Admissions committee.

In addition to her commitment to continue her work (and advocacy) to reduce preventable blindness in children, Owoeye enjoys teaching.

Prior to moving to Pikeville, she organized her church’s annual health fairs for her entire congregation for close to 10 years. She and her husband enjoy spending time with family, traveling and watching their daughters’ dance performances.






Maiyon Park, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Office: Coal Building 814
Telephone: 606.218.5427
E-mail: MaiyonPark@upike.edu





Ph.D. in Biological Science
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Masters in Biological Science 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Mentoring faculty at West Virginia State University
Served as a mentor of Dr. Hankins at West Virginia State University with his grant awarded
Grant title: Sex Steroid Hormones and Epigenetics in Meningiomas
Grant period: 5/01/2010 - 4/30/2014,10% effort for Maiyon Park

KY-PHYS (Kentucky Physiology Society), member from 2013
AACR (American Association for Cancer Research), active member from 2005 to 2012

Research fellowship for two graduate students (Matt Harlow and Ryan Mackie): Agent: NASA West Virginia Space Grant (7/01/2010 – 6/30/2011)
- Title: Chmp1A regulates tumor growth by the control of retinoblastoma protein
- Title: Chmp1A mediated histone modification in HEK 293T and PanC-1 cells
COBRE Grant
- 1 P20 RR020180-01 (PI of Project 3), NIH/NCRR, 7/1/04-6/30/09 (50% effort)
- Title: Transcription Factors in Cancer

Research Committee (Vice Chair): 2012 - present at KYCOM
Faculty Affair: 2013 - present

1. Sumanth Manohar, Matthew Harlow, Hahn Nguyen, Jing Li, Gerald Hankins, Maiyon Park, Chromatin modifying protein 1A (Chmp1A) of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III family regulates ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in pancreatic tumor (PanC-1) cells: Cell Cycle, Aug/1, 2011; 10(15)
2. Li, J., Orr, B., White, K., Belogortseva, N., Niles, R., Boskovic, G., Nguyen, H., Dykes, A., and Park, M. Chmp1A is a mediator of the anti-proliferative effects of All-trans Retinoic Acid in pancreatic cancer cells, Molecular Cancer 2009, 8:7 doi:10.1186/1476-4598-8-7
3. Jing Li, Natalia Belogortseva, David Porter and Maiyon Park, Chmp1A functions as a novel tumor suppressor gene in human embryonic kidney and ductal pancreatic tumor cells. Cell Cycle, Sep/18, 2008 15; 7(18)
4. Park, M., Moon, RT. The planar cell polarity gene strabismus regulates cell behaviour and cell fate in vertebrate embryos. Nature Cell Biology (cover story). 2002 Jan; 4(1): 20-25.
5. Venkstesh, TV., Park, M., Ocorr, K., Nemaceck, J., Golden, K., Wemple, M., Bodmer, R. Cardiac enhancer activity of the homeobox gene tinman depends on CREB consensus binding sites in Drosophila. Genesis. 2000 Jan; 26(1): 55-66.
6. Kuhl, M., Sheldahl, LC., Park, M., Miller, JR., Moon, RT. The Wnt/Ca2+ pathway; a new vertebrate Wnt signaling pathway takes shape. Trends Genet. 2000 Jul; 16(7): 279-83. Review.
7. Sheldahl, L., Park, M., Malbon CC., Moon, RT. Protein kinase C is differentially stimulated by Wnt and Frizzled homologs in a G-protein dependent manner. Curr. Biol. 1999 Jul; 9(13): 695-698.
8. Park, M., Lewis, C., Turbay, D., Chung, A., Chen, J-N., Evans, S., Breitbart, R.E., Fishman, M., Izumo, S., Bodmer, R. Differential rescue of visceral and cardiac defects in Drosophila by vertebrate tinman genes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 1998 Aug; 95(16): 9366-9371.
9. Park, M., Yaich, L., Bodmer, R. Mesodermal cell fate decisions are under the control of the lineage genes numb and Notch. Mechanisms of Development. 1998 Jul; 75(1-2):117-126.
10. Park, M., Venkatesh, TV., Bodmer, R. Dual role for the zeste-white3/shaggyencoded kinase in mesoderm and heart development of Drosophila. Developmental Genetics. 1998; 22(3): 201-211.
11. Yaich, L., Ooi, J., Park, M., Borg, J-P., Landry C., Bodmer, R., Margolis, B. Functional analysis of the Numb phosphotyrosine-binding domain using site-directed mutagenesis. J. Biol. Chem. 1998 Apr 24; 273(1): 10381-10388.
12. Bodmer, R., Golden, K., Lockwood, W., Occor, K., Park, M., Su, M., Venkatesh, TV. (1997): Hear development in Drosophila. In Advances in Developmental Biology, (ed. P. Wassweman), JAI press, Greenwich, CT. Vol 5, pp, 201-236.
13. Park, M., Wu, X., Golden, K., Axelrod, DJ., Bodmer, R. The wingless signaling pathway is directly involved in Drosophila heart development. Dev. Biol. 1996 Jul 10;177(1).

 



Cathryn J. Rehmeyer, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Pathology 

Office: Coal Building 817
Telephone: 606.218.5431
E-mail: CathrynRehmeyer@upike.edu





Doctor of Philosophy, Plant Pathology
University of Kentucky (2005)

Dissertation: “Sequencing of chromosome ends and characterization of a telomere-linked helicase gene family in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe
oryzae.


Master of Arts, Secondary Education with Biology Emphasis
Morehead State University (2003)

Bachelor of Arts, Teaching Biology, Music minor
Transylvania University (1995)

Starnes, J.H., D.W. Thornbury, C.J. Rehmeyer, I. Chuma, Y. Tosa, and M.L. Farman. (2012). Telomere-targeted retrotransposons in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae: agents of telomere instability. Genetics. 191(2):389-406.

Rehmeyer, Cathryn J. (2011) Male circumcision and HPV studies reviewed by infection stage and virus type. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 2011;111(3 suppl 2):S11-S18.

Stajich, J.E., S.K. Wilke, D. Ahrén, C.H. Au, B.W. Birren, M. Borodovsky, C. Burns, B. Canbäck, L.A. Casselton, C.K. Cheng, J. Deng, F.S Dietrich, D.C. Fargo, M.L. Farman, A.C. Gathman, J. Goldberg, R. Guigó, P.J. Hoegger, J.B. Hooker, A. Huggins, T.Y. James, T. Kamada, S. Kilaru, C. Kodira, U. Kües, D. Kupfer, H.S. Kwan, A. Lomsadze, W. Li, W.W. Lilly, L.J. Ma, A.J. Mackey, G. Manning, F. Martin, H. Muraguchi, D.O. Natvig, H. Palmerini, M.A. Ramesh, C.J. Rehmeyer, B.A. Roe, N. Shenoy, M. Stanke, V. Ter-Hovhannisyan, A. Tunlid, R. Velagapudi, T.J. Vision, Q. Zeng, M.E. Zolan, P.J. Pukkila. (2010) Insights into evolution of multicellular fungi from the assembled chromosomes of themushroom Coprinopsis cinerea (Coprinus cinereus). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 107(26):11889-94.

Rehmeyer, C.J., W. Li, Kusaba, M. and M.L. Farman. (2009) The telomere-linked helicase (TLH) gene family in Magnaporthe oryzae: revised gene structure reveals a novel TLH-specific motif. Current Genetics. 55(3): 253-62.

Rehmeyer, C.J., W. Li, and M.L. Farman (2006) Organization of chromosome ends in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Nucleic Acids Research. 34 (17): 4685-701.

Dean, R.A., Talbot, N.J., Ebbole, D.J., Farman, M.L., Mitchell, T., Orbach, M.J., Thon, M., Kulkarni, R., Xu, J., Pan, H., Read, N.D., Lee, Y., Carbone, I., Brown, D., Soanes, D.M., Djonovic, S., Kolomiets, E., Rehmeyer, C.J., Li, W., Harding, M., Kim, S., Lebrun, M., Bohnert, H., Butler, J., Calvo, S., Ma, L., Nicol, R., Purcell, S., Nusbaum, C., Galagan, J.E., and Birren, B.W. (2005) Analysis of the genome sequence of the plant pathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Nature. 434 (7036): 980-6.

Li, W., C.J. Rehmeyer, C. Staben, M.L. Farman. (2004) TruMatch – A BLAST post-processor that identifies and reports bona fide sequence matches. Bioinformatics. 21(9): 2097-8.

Li, W., C.J. Rehmeyer, C. Staben, M.L. Farman. (2004) TERMINUS – Telomeric End-Read Mining IN Unassembled Sequences. Bioinformatics. 21(8): 1695-8.

KYCOM Golden Apple Teaching Award, 2007, 2010, and 2011
Graduate Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation, 2003-2006
M.S. Fuller Travel Award for travel to the 2005 MSA annual meeting in Hilo, Hawaii, Mycological Society of America, 2005
Program for Excellence in Science awardee, AAAS/Science, 2004-2006
Travel award to present research at the 9th U.S.-Japan Seminar on Plant Pathogen
Interactions: Genomic and Genetic Analysis of Plant Parasitism and Defense, Shizuoka,
Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, 2003
Benjamin Cummings Publishing Campbell Biology Prize, Second Place, 1994

Dr. Rehmeyer joined the KYCOM family in January 2006. She enjoys gardening, backpacking, fishing, hunting, playing music and travel. She lives in Pikeville with her husband, John, and young daughters, Vivian and Caroline.




James Rogala, O.D.

Associate Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 501G
Telephone: 606.218.5519
E-mail: JamesRogala@upike.edu





Course Director, OPT 628 Posterior Segment Disease I
Course Director, OPT 715 Posterior Segment Disease II
Course Director, OPT 625 Anterior Segment Disease
Course Director, OPT 716 Glaucoma Diagnosis and Management
Course Director, OPT 514 Clinical Skills I
Instructor, OPT 526 Ocular Anatomy and Histology
Instructor, OPT 524 Clinical Skills II
 

Doctor of Optometry
The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Mich.
 

Kentucky Optometric License with ETP (laser & minor surgery) credentials
California Optometric License with Glaucoma Certification
Michigan Optometric License with TPA Certification
New Zealand Optometric License with Therapeutic Certification
DEA certification

Dr. Rogala earned his Doctorate in Optometry from the Ohio State University after graduating from Michigan State University with highest honors in the biological sciences. Before joining the faculty at the Kentucky College of Optometry, Dr. Rogala was an associate professor at Western University of the Health Sciences where he was the course leader for Diagnosis and Treatment of the Posterior Segment, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Anterior Segment and Special Procedures in Optometry as well as a major lecturer for Neurological Disease Diagnosis and Treatment.

From 2007 until joining the faculty at Western University in 2011, Dr. Rogala taught ocular pathology at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, where he was course coordinator for Diseases of the Eye and Visual System: Diagnosis and Management. During his time down under, he was also an examiner for the Optometric Council of Australia and New Zealand. Prior to that, he served as clinical faculty for the Michigan College of Optometry at Ferris State University while a member of the medical staff at a large multidisciplinary health care center.

Dr. Rogala recently spent a semester at the University of New South Wales in Australia conducting research on macular degeneration that was presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. His current research activities involve the application of novel ophthalmic imaging technologies to better understand, diagnose, and treat disorders of the posterior segment of the eye.
 




Patrick A. Scott, O.D., Ph.D. FAAO

Assistant Professor of Optometry

Office: Health Professions Education Building 504
E-mail: PatrickScott@upike.edu

 

 

 

Patrick A. Scott, O.D., Ph.D., FAAO completed his master of science in vision science degree (M.S.) as well as a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) degree at the New England College of Optometry and then went on to complete a master of arts degree (M.A.) and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in anatomy and neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine. He is full-time faculty and assistant professor in the department of anatomical sciences and neurobiology at University of Louisville (U of L) School of Medicine. Scott teaches cadaveric dissection in the medical gross anatomy course at U of L. Scott is director of the contact lens service and attending optometrist for the U of L Ophthalmology and Optometric Retina Society. He is a recipient of numerous awards including the National Glaucoma Societie’s Resident Award, AOF William C. Ezell Fellowship, Fight for Sight Grant-in-Aid, and AOF/Beta Sigma Kappa Research Fellowship. He is the author of Scott’s Anatomy of the Eye and Orbit, Essential Opthalmoscopy for Medical Students and General Practitioners and (forthcoming) Scott’s Head and Neck Anatomy for Optometrists.




Julia H. Smith, DHEd

Gross Anatomy Laboratory Instructor 

Office: Coal Building 802
Telephone: 606.218.5401
E-mail: JuliaSmith@upike.edu




Josh Watson Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Physiology

Office: Coal Building 816
Telephone: 606.218.5433
E-mail: JoshWatson@upike.edu





Physiology

Postdoctoral Training, 2012-2015
Duke University

Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics, 2011
University of Louisville

M.S. in Physiology and Biophysics, 2008
University of Louisville

B.S. in Biology and Chemistry 2005
Western Kentucky University
 

2016 - Present: Assistant Professor
Founding Faculty, Basic Sciences
Kentucky College of Optometry
University of Pikeville

2015 - Present: Assistant Professor
Basic Sciences
Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine
University of Pikeville

2015: Adjunct Professor
Department of Arts, Sciences and University Transfer
Durham Technical Community College

2014 - 2015: Adjunct Professor
Department of Math, Science and Wellness
Central Carolina Community College

2013 - 2015: Institutional NRSA Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Medicine-Division of Cardiology
Duke University

2012 - 2013: Postdoctoral Associate
Department of Medicine-Division of Cardiology
Duke University

Institutional National Research Service Award Recipient - April 2013

School of Medicine’s Outstanding Graduate Student - December 2011

Graduate Dean’s Citation - December 2011

American Heart Association Predoctoral Fellowship - July 2008 - June 2010

American Heart Association Basic Cardiovascular Science Travel Award - 2007

Integrated Programs in Biomedical Sciences (IPIBS) Doctoral Fellowship - 2006 - 2008

Dassanayaka S*, Brainard R E*, Watson L J, Long B W, Brittain K R, Demartino A M, Aird A L, Muthusamy S, Hamid T, Prabhu S D, Jones S P. Cardiomyocyte Ogt limits ventricular dysfunction affecting hypertrophy in mice following pressure overload. Basic Res Cardiol. 2017 May;112(3):23.
 
Pironti G, Stanchan R T, Abraham D, Yu, S, Chen M, Chen W, Hanada K, Mao L, Watson L J, and Rockamn H A. Circulating exosomes induced by pressure overload contain functional Angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Circulation. 2015 Jun 16;131(24):2120-30.
 
Muthusamy S, De Martino A M, Watson L J, Brittian K R, Zafir A, Dassanayaka S, Hong K U, Jones S P.  MicroRNA-539 is upregulated in failing and diabetic hearts, and suppresses O-GlcNAcase expression J Biol Chem. 2014 Oct 24;289(43):29665-76.
 
Sansbury B E*, DeMartino A M*, Xie Z*, Brooks A C*, Brainard R E, Watson L J, DiFilippis A P, Cummins T D, Harbeson M A, Brittian K R, Prabhu S D, Bhatnagar A, Jones S P, and Hill B G.  Metabolomic analysis of pressure-overloaded and infarcted mouse hearts. Circ Heart Fail. 2014 Jul;7(4):634-42.
 
Watson L J, Long B W, DeMartino A M, Brittian K R, Readnower R D, Brainard R E, Cummins T D, Annamalai L, Hill B G, and Jones S P.  Cardiomyocyte ogt is Essential for Postnatal Viability. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2014 Jan;306(1):H142-53.
 
Brainard R E, Watson L J, DeMartino A M, Brittian K R, Readnower R D, Boakye A A, Zhang D, Hoetker J D, Bhatnagar A, Baba S P, Jones S P. High Fat Feeding in Mice Is Insufficient to Induce Cardiac Dysfunction and Does Not Exacerbate Heart Failure. PLoS One. 2013 Dec 18;8(12):e83174
 
Wang J, Xu J, Wang Q, Brainard R E, Watson L J, Jones S P, and Epstein P N.  Reduced cardiac fructose 2,6 bisphosphate increases hypertrophy and decreases glycolysis following aortic constriction. PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53951
 
Facundo H T*, Brainard R E*, Watson L J, Ngoh G A, Hamid T, Prabhu S D, and Jones S P.  O-GlcNAc signaling is essential for NFAT-mediated transcriptional reprogramming during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 May 15;302(10):H2122-30.
 
Wang J, Wang Q, Watson L J, Jones S P, and Epstein P N.  Cardiac overexpression of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 protects against cardiac fibrosis following transaortic constriction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2011 Nov;301(5):H2073-80
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, Facundo H T, and Jones S P.  Augmented O-GlcNAc signaling attenuates oxidative stress and calcium overload in cardiomyocytes.  Amino Acids. 2011 Mar;40(3):895-911
 
Watson L J, Facundo H T, Ngoh G A, Ameen M, Brainard R E, Lemma K M, Long B W, Prabhu S D, Xuan Y, and Jones S P.  O-GlcNAc transferase is indispensable in the failing heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Oct 12;107(41):17797-802
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, Facundo H T, Dillmann W, and Jones S P. Non-canonical glycosyltransferase modulates post-hypoxic myocyte death and mitochondrial permeability transition.  Jol Mol Cell Cardiol. 2008 Aug;45(2):313-25.
 
Wang Q, Donthi R V, Wang J, Lange A J, Watson L J, Jones S P, and Epstein P N. Cardiac phosphatase-deficient 6-phosphofructokinase-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphotase increases glycolysis, hypertrophy, and myocyte resistance to hypoxia. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2008 Jun;294(6):H2889-97.
 
Greer J J, Kakkar A K, Elrod J W, Watson L J, Jones S P, and Lefer D J. Low-dose simvastatin improves survival and ventricular function via eNOS in congestive heart failure. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Dec;291(6):H2743-51.
 
 
Abstracts
 
Bingham, J and Watson L J. O-GlcNAc and Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Appalachian College Association Summit XIX 2016. *Selected as Best Poster Presentation.
 
Dassanayaka S, Brainard R E, Watson L J, Long B W, Brittian K R, DeMartino A M, Aird A L, Kilfoil P J, Muthusamy S, Hamid T, Prabhu S D, Jones S P. Cardiomyocyte Ogt limits ventricular dysfunction in mice following pressure overload without affecting hypertrophy. FASEB J April 2016 30:1273.2
 
Abraham D M, Lee T E, Watson L J, Mao L, Chandock G, Wolf M J, Rockman H A.  TREK-1 Modulates Fibrosis & Diastolic Dysfunction Through Activation of Stress-Activated Kinases. Circulation. 2014;130: A14688
 
DeMartino A M, Brainard R E, Watson L, Brittian K R, Readnower R D, Boakye A A, Zhang D, Hoetker J D, Bhatnagar A, Baba S P, and Jones S P.  High Fat Feeding in Mice is Insufficient to Induce Cardiac Dysfunction and does not Exacerbate Heart Failure. FASEB J April 2014 28:688.11
 
DeMartino A M, Watson L, Long B W, Brittian K R, Readnower R D, Brainard R E, Cummins T D, Annamalai L, Hill B G, and Jones S P.  Cardiomyocyte Ogt is essential for maintaining cardiac function.  FASEB J April 2014 28:1078.1
 
Muthusamy S, Watson L J, Hong K U, and Jones S P. MicroRNA-539 Upregulation Suppresses O-GlcNAcase in the Failing Heart. Circulation. 2013;128:A18609
 
Brooks A C, Sansbury B E, Xie Z, Brainard R E, Watson L J, Brittian K R, Prabhu S D, Jones S P, Bhatnagar A, and Hill B G.  Metabolic analysis of the early and late hypertrophic heart.  Circulation Research. 2011;109:AP137
 
Watson L J, Jones S P.  High fat diet does not exacerbate infarct induced heart failure. FASEB J.  March 2011 25:1097.16
 
Watson L J, Ngoh G A, and Jones S P.  Temporal changes in O-GlcNAc signaling during myocardial ischemia reperfusion.  Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions 2010. *In Top 10% of abstracts accepted.
 
Watson L J, Facundo H T, Ngoh, G A, and Jones S P.  O-GlcNAc Transferase deficiency exacerbates metabolic defects in the failing heart. FASEB J.  April 2009 23:793.18.
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, and Jones S P. Loss of O-GlcNAc Transferase activity sensitizes cardiac myocytes to post-hypoxic death. FASEB J. April 2008 22:750.10.
 
Watson L J, Facundo H T, Ngoh G A, Hamid T, Prabhu S D, Xuan Y, and Jones S P.  O-GlcNAc Transferase is indispensable in heart failure. Circulation. Oct 2008;118:S_442.
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, and Jones S P. O-GlcNAc Transferase is a pro-survival enzyme in post-hypoxic cardiac myocytes. FASEB J. April 2007 21:726.6.
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, and Jones S P. O-GlcNAcase exacerbates post-hypoxic cardiac myocyte death. FASEB J. 2007 21:958.9.
 
Watson L J, Ngoh G A, Zhu Y, Campbell A L, Xuan Y, and Jones S P.  Paradoxical reduction in glycosylation sensitizes the diabetic heart to mitochondrial permeability transition.  Circulation. Oct 2007;116:II_121.
 
Ngoh G A, Watson L J, Harrison L T, and Jones S P.  Degradation of metabolic post-translational modification sensitizes cardiac myocytes to hypoxia. Circulation. Oct 2006;114:II_99.

Josh Watson, Ph.D., was raised in the western reaches of Appalachia on a tobacco and cattle farm in the small town of Liberty, Ky. He received his bachelor’s degree from Western Kentucky University. He served as a laboratory technician for three of his four years and as an independent laboratory instructor for two years. The experiences cemented his desire to both educate and perform research as his career. Following a short stint as laboratory technician at the University of Alabama at Birmingham he began his doctoral training at the University of Louisville. His training at UofL was focused primarily on cardiac physiology and the associated pathologies of heart failure and diabetes. Following completion of his doctorate degree he accepted a postdoctoral position at Duke University where he again focused on cardiovascular biology from a cellular signaling and adrenergic receptor perspective. During his time at Duke, he was reintroduced to the world of education when he was offered several undergraduate anatomy and physiology lectures at nearby community colleges. With his appointment at Duke running out and having a strong desire to be closer to his family he began his search for a position that would allow him to educate, research and serve his home region. He found such an opportunity at KYCOM and the University of Pikeville and now KYCO.

Watson teaches medical physiology for both KYCOM and KYCO as well as spending as much time in the lab as possible. His current research is focused on utilizing Drosophila as a model organism to determine novel therapeutics in diabetes and heart failure. In his free time he enjoys writing short biographies in the third person, cooking for his wife, playing with his three dogs, brewing beer and watching football.




Burton Webb, Ph.D.

President, University of Pikeville 
Professor of Immunology



Office: President's Office
Telephone: 606.218.5261
E-mail: President@upike.edu


 

Medical Immunology

B.S. Zoology
Olivet Nazarene University Kankakee, Il. 1987

M.A. Biology
Ball State University Muncie, IN 1992

Ph.D. Immunology
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 1995

2002 – 2011 Professor of Biology,
Indiana Wesleyan University 1998 – 2002 Associate Professor of Biology,
Indiana Wesleyan University

2000 – 2014 Associate Professor of Immunology and Physiology (tenure-track, then transitioned to part-time in fall 2002)
Indiana University School of Medicine
Muncie Center for Medical Education Muncie, Ind.

1994 - 1998 Assistant Professor of Biology,
Indiana Wesleyan University Marion, Ind.

1996 – 2015 Contracted Continuing Education for Health care Professionals (Contracted CEU for medical professionals)

1993 Medical Microbiology and Immunology,
Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis, Ind.

Boivin, Michael., Felt, Nathan., Geoffrey, Aaron., and Webb, Burton. Emotional, Neuropsychological, and Immunological Effects of Breast Cancer Treatment. Association for Psychological Science. 2006, New York, NY.

Schumacker, S., Boivin, M., and B. Webb Preliminary Evidence for the Role of Emotional and Spiritual Well-being in Immunomodulation for Breast Cancer Patients, as Mediated by Fatigue and Stress. 2005, FASEB – AIA San Diego, CA.

Webb, B., and Z. Brahmi. Cytokine mediated activation of human umbilical cord blood derived natural killer cells. 1993. Autumn Immunology Conference. Chicago, IL.

Webb, B., Hommel-Berrey, G., Morse, P., and Z. Brahmi. 1993. Effect of IL-12 on NK cell reactivation and generation of LAK cells from HUCB. American Association of Immunologists. Denver, CO. (Oral presentation)

Webb, B., Hommel-Berrey, G., Morse, P., and Z. Brahmi. 1993. Effect of IL-12 on NK cell reactivation and generation of LAK cells from HUCB. Sigma Xi. Indianapolis, IN.

Webb, B., Hommel-Berrey, G., Morse, P., and Z. Brahmi. 1993. Effect of IL-12 on NK cell reactivation and generation of LAK cells from HUCB. Indiana Branch of the American Society for Microbiology. Indianapolis, IN.

Webb, B., Morse, P., Hommel-Berrey, G., and Brahmi, Z. 1992. The role of IL-4 in the generation of cells with LAK activity from human PBL and umbilical cord blood. 21rst Annual Meeting, Autumn Immunology Conference. Chicago, IL.

Webb, B., Bochan, M., and Brahmi, Z. 1991. Il-7 and TNF-a are capable of inducing mini-LAK cells with perforin levels that correlate with killing. 20th Annual Meeting, Autumn Immunology Conference. Chicago, IL.

Bochan, M., Webb, B., and Brahmi, Z. 1991. Effect of IL-2 on the reactivation of a non- MHC restricted CTL and correlation with perforin levels. 20th Annual Meeting, Autumn Immunology Conference, Chicago, IL.

Webb, B., Bochan, M., and Brahmi, Z. 1992. Effect of several cytokines on CMC and perforin mRNA levels in mini-LAK and YT-INDY cells. FASEB Meetings, Anaheim, CA.

Bochan, M., Webb, B., and Brahmi, Z. 1992. The generation of LAK cells with low dose IL-2 correlation with perforin. Annual M.D./Ph.D. Conference, Aspen, CO. (Oral Presentation)

1989 Sigma XI research grant $500

1989 Graduate School Foundation research grant $500

1992 Autumn Immunology Conference research award, Chicago IL. (2nd place) 1993 Oral presentation of research, AAI, Denver, Co.

1993 Oral presentation of research, ASHI, Phoenix, AZ. 1994 Harold Raite Teaching Award, Indiana University

1995 Excellence in Teaching Award, Indiana Wesleyan University 1996 Excellence in Teaching Award, Indiana Wesleyan University

1997 Sunshine Arabian Farm Veterinary Medicine research grant “Research lab development: toward an influenza vaccine.” $15,000 (ongoing)

1998 – 2004 Eight Master Teacher Awards - $500 each

2000 CCCU initiative grant “Responding as Whole Persons in the Face of Life- Threatening Disease: An Evaluation of Interrelationships Between Quality of Life Measures, Beliefs, Neuropsychological Functioning, and Immunological Response for Cancer Patients” $15,000 for two years.

2001 Standardization of the Immunology Core Curriculum within the State-wide Medical Education System: Development of an interactive educational software based on the Immunology Core Curriculum Outline – $9,000 – for one year.

2003 Contributing Author – NSF Laboratory Improvement Grant ($200,000) Phase contrast microscopy.

2003 Contributing Author – Immunologic and Cognitive Development in Children hospitalized with Cerebral Malaria. (NIH R21 - 200,000)

2005 Recipient of the Science and Theology News Award for Outstanding Health research.

2006 Co-Investigator – The effect of well-being on Immunologic and patient outcomes in the context of breast cancer. Templeton Advanced Research Program ($1 million)

B. Webb, M. Bochan, and Z. Brahmi. (1994) The lack of NK cytotoxicity associated with fresh HUCB may be due to the presence of soluble HLA in the serum. Cellular Immunology. 159:246.

B. Webb. (1998) Pathophysiology. (Faculty module, student module and student study guide) Indiana Wesleyan University.

B. Webb. (1999) Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory Manual. IWU.

B. Webb. (2001) Interactive Medical Immunology (a CD-ROM containing essential medical Immunology).

Self-study for the American Association of Medical Colleges Accreditation Muncie Center for Medical Education

B. Webb. Bridges. (Winter 2005) Life, Personhood, and Somatic Nuclear Transfer: A Possible Solution to the Ethical Dilemma of Stem Cell Research

B. Webb: (2005) A Day in the Life. Reflections, Indiana University School of Medicine Press.

B. Webb (2005) Thin as the Wing of a Dragonfly. Reflections, Indiana University School of Medicine Press.

B. Webb and S. Lennox (2010) The Ethical Challenges of Genetic Engineering in Care of Creation Wesleyan Publishing House.

M. Boivin and B. Webb (2011) Co-authored a chapter in Spiritual Healing: Scientific and Religious Perspectives. Cambridge Press.

Burton Webb, Ph.D. was born and reared on a small farm in Michigan. The child of teachers, he knew from an early age that education would play a significant role in his life. Webb began serving as the University of Pikeville’s 21st president in 2016. He is married to Kay Webb, who holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology. The couple have two adult children.




Kay Webb, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Office: Health Professions Education Building 404
E-mail: KayWebb@upike.edu








J. Michael Younger, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Office: Coal Building 718
Telephone: 606.218.5417
E-mail: MichaelYounger@upike.edu





Medical Biochemistry

Doctor of Philosophy, Cell & Developmental Biology
University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill

Bachelor of Arts, Biology
Lindsey Wilson College

Nuclear Power Machinist & Mechanical Operator – Submarines
Naval Nuclear Power Training Program

Identify functional and structural similarities and differences of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2. These very similar proteins are often, if not always, misregulated in cancer. Determining the redundant and independent roles of these two proteins in both the healthy and diseased state may contribute significantly to our understanding of pathways leading to the inhibition and progression of cancer.

Dr. Younger grew up in North West Indiana (Portage, Ind.) near Chicago. He served in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Providence SSN 719 Fast Attack Submarine stationed in Groton/New London, Conn., and is a Veteran of Foreign War having served during Desert Storm. He enjoys the outdoors and just about anything that involves wood construction, mechanical repair or troubleshooting, development of renewable energy sources or boating. He is dedicated to spending time with his children and two grandchildren and enjoys life in Pikeville, Ky.




Dana R. Ziegler, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
Assistant Professor of Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience

Office: Coal Building 820
Telephone: 606.218.5412
E-mail: DanaZiegler@upike.edu




Gross Anatomy (lab)
Neuroscience (lecture & lab)

Bachelor of Arts, Biology
Wesleyan University

Doctor of Philosophy, Anatomy & Neurobiology
University of Kentucky Medical School

1. Ziegler DR, ME Krcmarik ME, YM Ulrich-Lai, JP Herman, WE Cullinan (2011), Brainstem origins of glutamatergic innervation to the rat paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. J. Comp. Neurol. 520(11):2369-2394

2. YM Ulrich-Lai, KR Jones, DR Ziegler, WE Cullinan, JP Herman. (2011) Forebrain origins of glutamatergic innervation to the rat paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus: differential inputs to the anterior versus posterior subregions. J. Comp. Neurol. 519(7):1301-1319.

3. DR Ziegler, WE Cullinan, JP Herman. (2005) Organization and Regulation of Paraventricular Nucleus Glutamate Signaling Systems: NMDA receptors. J. Comp. Neurol., 484(1):43-56

4. DR Ziegler and M Gallagher. (2005) Spatial memory in middle-aged female rats: assessment of estrogen replacement after ovariectomy. Brain Research 1052(2):163-173

5. KA Helm, DR Ziegler, M Gallagher. (2004) Habituation to Stress and Dexamethasone Suppression in Rats with Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Lesions. Hippocampus 14(5):628-635

6. DR Ziegler, WE Cullinan, JP Herman. (2002) Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter mRNA in rat hypothalamus. J. Comp. Neurol. 448:217-229

7. DR Ziegler, JP Herman. (2000) Local integration of glutamate signaling in the hypothalamic paraventricular region: regulation of glucocorticoid stress responses. Endocrinology 141(12):4801-4804

8. JP Herman, O Eyigor, DR Ziegler, L Jennes. (2000) Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit mRNAs in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the rat. J. Comp Neurol. 422:352-362

9. WA Pedersen, C Culmsee, DR Ziegler, JP Herman, MP Mattson. (1999) Aberrant stress response associated with severe hypoglycemia in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. J. Mol. Neurosci. 13:159-165

10. DR Ziegler, WA Cass, JP Herman. (1999) Excitatory influence of the locus coeruleus in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis responses to stress.
J Neuroendocrinology 11:361-369

Dr. Ziegler’s core research interest is the neuroanatomical and neurochemical pathways that activate or inhibit the release of stress hormones (glucocorticoids) and how dysfunction in these brain systems play a role in the development and treatment of such mental health disorders as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Regulation of this neuroendocrine stress response system by the brain is critical not only for catabolic energy mobilization and the physiological defense of homeostasis but also for adaptive behavioral responses and optimal cognitive function during and following stressful events. However, either deficient or excessive glucocorticoid secretion patterns can lead to impaired neuronal cell function and morphology, disrupted neurochemical signaling in the brain and dysfunctional regulation of gene expression because glucocorticoid receptors act as transcription factors in the periphery and brain.

Dr. Ziegler’s research has focused on dissecting the neuroanatomy and functional role of noradrenergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways that encode stressful stimuli and act to activate or inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis via projections that converge on a key site in the brain: the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH). This nucleus contains neurons that secrete corticotropin-releasing hormone, which initiates the HPA stress response and ultimately drives glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex. 

More recently, Dr. Ziegler’s interests have expanded to examine the interactions between anxiety-related brain systems and HPA/stress neurocircuitry. Here at KYCOM, Dr. Ziegler will be primarily dedicated to teaching neuroscience and other anatomy courses. However, through collaborations with other neuroscientists, another research avenue of interest is to investigate the role of individual differences in HPA stress responses in two animal models of PTSD: 1) predator stress and 2) impaired fear conditioning or extinction learning. Collectively, these studies have involved a range of experimental approaches and techniques, including: localized neurotoxic or immunotoxic lesions or neuropharmacological infusions, tract-tracing, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and an array of behavioral tests.

Postdoctoral Trainee Fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health
National Research Service Award (NRSA) Predoctoral Fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health
Predoctoral Trainee Fellowship, National Institute of Aging

1. WE Cullinan, DR Ziegler, JP Herman. (2008) Functional Role of Local GABAergic Influences on the HPA Axis. Brain Structure & Function. 213:63-72

2. DR Ziegler & JP Herman. (2002) Neurocircuitry of Stress Integration: Anatomical Pathways Regulating the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis of the Rat. Integr. Comp. Biol., Jul 2002; 42: 541 – 551

Dr. Ziegler joined the KYCOM faculty in August 2013. Outside the classroom and lab, he will often be found on the running trails in the area or running, hiking or biking through the great state parks close by, anywhere with live music and at the Jenny Wiley Theatre. Originally from the east coast, his career has taken him through Lexington (graduate school at University of Kentucky) and Cincinnati, then postdoctoral research in Baltimore and Milwaukee, before arriving in Pikeville.


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