About

Why should I major in history?

Majoring in history is a more practical choice than students may think. This discipline takes the long view and examines the causes, results and chronologies of events as well as analyzing human experience from multiple perspectives. The University of Pikeville history professors teach students how to analyze written, oral, visual and material evidence and stress the development of communication skills and critical thinking. These skills are adaptable to a variety of occupations and are in demand in today’s world. Companies are eager to hire people who can communicate effectively through the written and spoken word and who are experienced at analyzing large amounts of information. What is sought among prospective employees is the development of certain skills and abilities that can be developed not only through an academic major but through courses taken as part of one’s general education, and through internships, directed studies, tutorials, seminars, summer employment and volunteer experiences.

What can I do with a history degree from the University of Pikeville?
A history background provides an excellent foundation for those who seek careers in government, law, journalism, teaching and other occupations. The versatility of this University of Pikeville major is evident in the wide variety of occupations graduates pursue. Some go into teaching at the college level. A large number of graduates become lawyers, one of the more traditional careers sought by history majors, since a good lawyer not only has to know the law but understand where it originated and how it was developed. Many history majors pursue careers in libraries and archives where they organize the records of the past and assist others in using them.

History at the University of Pikeville
The history and history/political science programs are offered through the Division of Social Science. These majors focus on the processes of institutional change within societies. Recognizing that human experience is continuous, history seeks to understand how people lived in the past and how their institutions shaped their world and our own. The major in history/political science further addresses these issues, with particular emphasis on the political process and its consequences.

History Degree Options
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
History Careers
Archivist
Arts Conservator
Author
Consultant
Editor
Historian
Library Director
Legislator
Lawyer
Librarian
Museum Director
Paralegal
Professor
Public Analyst
Public Relations Specialist

 

Courses

HIS 221 World Civilization I
A survey of the social, cultural, political, and religious development of world civilizations from the origins of man to the Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 099 or placement beyond.

HIS 222 World Civilization II
A continuation of the topics explored in HIS 221, concerning the development and origins of world civilization. Prerequisite: ENG 099 or placement beyond.

HIS 225 American History I
A survey of the British colonial experience in North America and history of the United States from its founding to the post Civil War reconstruction. Considerable emphasis is placed on the changes in American society, as well as important events and conflicts. All topics are examined in a global context. Prerequisite: ENG 099 or placement beyond.

HIS 226 American History II
A continuation of HIS 225, which examines the history of the United States from the post Civil War period to the present. All topics are examined in a global context. Prerequisite: ENG 099 or placement beyond.

HIS 301 History of the Christian Church
The historical and theological movements in the Church, from its earliest foundations to the counter Reformation. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of the Church with other prevailing European social, cultural, and political institutions. HIS 221 and ENG 112 or ENG 115 and at least one course in Religion. Cross-listed as REL 301.

HIS 312 Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1917
A study of the history of Russia and the Soviet Union 1917. With special emphasis on the cultural, ethnic, and geographic make-up of the Soviet Union, the ideological and political structure of the Soviet government, and the causes and outcomes of various events in Soviet and Russian history and their differing interpretations. Prerequisite: HIS 222.

HIS 314 British History Since 1815
A study of Britain's political, social, diplomatic, and economic development during the modern period. Special consideration given to the further development of parliamentary democracy and the Cabinet. Emphasis is placed upon the role of Britain in World Wars I and II and its position in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: HIS 222. HIS 324 Europe, 1815 - 1920
The history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna through World War I, with special stress on nationalism, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, and diplomacy. Prerequisite: HIS 222.

HIS 324 Europe, 1815 - 1920
The history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna through World War I, with special stress on nationalism, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, and diplomacy. Prerequisite: HIS 222.

HIS 364 Imperial China
This is an examination of the philosophical, cultural, and political development of Imperial Chinese dynasties up to the fall of the Ming Dynasty in 1644. Included will be a study of Chinese geography and a concentration upon the continuing ethnic struggles that influenced Chinese development. Prerequisites: HIS 221 and HIS 222 or Instructor’s permission.

HIS 365 Modern China 1644-Present
A survey of the economic, cultural, and political development of modern China. The course examines changing values and how the popular uprisings of the late Qing Dynasty led to the Communist revolution of the 20th century. A special emphasis is placed upon the lingering effects of colonialism and how that legacy continues to influence China’s relations with western nations. Prerequisites: HIS 221 and HIS 222 or Instructor’s permission.

HIS 401 Religion in America
The study of the phenomenon of religion in America and its historical and cultural development from the early colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the dominance of religious institutions within colonial American society; historical and current definitions of religious freedom; and the contribution of various religious groups to the overall development of the American character. Students will also be given the opportunity to participate in a local church history project as part of their course work. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226, and at least one course in Religion or approval by course Instructor. Cross listed as REL 401.

HIS 426 Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1600-1781
A study of the growth of colonial America up through revolution and independence. Topics examined will be the search for colonial stability and order, the role of religion in shaping colonial attitudes, and the colonial relationship to an expanding Atlantic World. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226.

HIS 427 Americans United and Divided, 1781-1865
An examination of the rapid political, economic, and social changes that shaped the United States in the nineteenth century, and ultimately led to the Civil War. Among the topics addressed will be slavery and antebellum reform, the dispute over constitutional interpretations of states rights, and the evolution of a two party system. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226.

HIS 429 America Enters the Modern Age, 1865-1900
This course studies the industrialization and urbanization of the United States during the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Topics include Reconstruction, the growth of the federal government in response to change, Imperialism, and the rise of populism. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226.

HIS 431 The United States from 1900 to 1945
A study of early twentieth century US history from the progressive era to the end of World War II. Topics include the Progressives at home and abroad, the Depression, World Wars I and II, and the growing role of the United States in the world. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226.

HIS 432 The United States from 1945 to the Present
A study of late twentieth century US history from the end of World War II to the present. Topics include the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Civil Rights, Watergate, and the changing role of the United States in the world. Prerequisites: HIS 225 and HIS 226.

HIS 463 American Foreign Relations, 1776 to Present
A study of events and policies which have dominated the history of American foreign relations from 1776 to the present. Prerequisites: HIS 225, and HIS 226 or PLS 223. Cross-listed as PLS 463.

HIS 490 Special Topics
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit any number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of history and permission of the Instructor.

HIS 495 Seminar in History
An intensive course in research methods and analysis of a selected topic of historical and political significance. May be cross-listed as PLS 495.

HIS 497 Historiography and Research Methods
A capstone course in historiography and research methods. Historiography is the study of the development and writing of history as a discipline and when combined with research methods will help prepare students for graduate study in the field of history. The course will require a major research paper and presentation. Prerequisites: 21 hours of history and/or political science

HIS 499 Directed Individual Study
Under special conditions, with the consent of the Division Chair, a major in the department may pursue an approved course of reading in a particular field of history. Required are weekly reports to the Instructor, a paper or papers embodying the results of the study, and an examination. Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of the Instructor, Division Chair, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Faculty

Name: Steve Budney
Title: Professor of History
Email: StephenBudney@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5009
Office: Armington 434

Name: Nancy Cade
Title: Chair, Division of Social Sciences/Davenport Distinguished Professor of History/Political Science
Email: NancyCade@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5007
Office: Armington 450

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