About

Why should I major in criminal justice?

Of all the problems that the social sciences might address, the upgrading of our criminal justice system would seem to be among the most important. Yet, the complexity and enormity of this problem—as well as the traditional boundaries of the liberal arts—have imposed limits on efforts to study the criminal justice system, except within narrow technical and operational contexts. In recent years, however, concern with the quality of the personnel of the criminal justice system has become intensified by abrasive social upheaval in our society, rising street crime and disorders related to the role of social and political protest in a democratic society. All of these combine as a catalyst encouraging renewed efforts to improve the educational backgrounds of our criminal justice professionals.

What can I do with a criminal justice degree from the University of Pikeville?
The criminal justice program at the University of Pikeville is designed to educate students for leadership positions in the field of criminal justice. This field prepares students for a variety of professional settings, including law enforcement, correctional case management, correctional education, chemical dependency and substance abuse counseling, victim-offender mediation and alternative dispute resolution or pre-law. Employment is often found in government, the private sector, universities and nonprofit organizations. Government is the largest employer in the criminal justice field, with approximately 50 percent employed at the local level. The field of criminal justice is constantly changing to meet the new demands of a changing society. Employment opportunities are expected to increase faster than average for all other occupations.

Criminal Justice at the University of Pikeville
The criminal justice program is a part of the Division of Social Sciences. Multidisciplinary by design, the program consists of a core of required courses in criminal justice (beyond the general studies core), combined with a foundation and a theory-method sequence of courses in the social sciences. The multidisciplinary thrust of the major is also evident in the option of a self-designed emphasis of 21 hours drawn from other disciplines. Two other concentrated emphases supplementing the criminal justice core requirements are in law enforcement and corrections. This major also includes a “portfolio” option, with a potential 15 hours of academic credit derived from work or other educational experience for qualified students, and an off-campus practicum or internship, usually within one of the social science disciplines. Following the foundation courses in sociology and psychology, students select a theory-methods sequence from either of those two social sciences. This foundation, together with the criminal justice core, a concentrated emphasis and related electives, provides a unique, comprehensive bachelor’s degree program. The criminal justice field prepares students for a variety of professional settings, including law enforcement, correctional case management, correctional education, chemical dependency and substance abuse counseling, victim-offender mediation and alternative dispute resolution or pre-law.

Additional options in the criminal justice program include an associate degree and a criminal justice minor. The associate degree includes 34 hours of study in criminal justice. The criminal justice minor is composed of 21 hours of required and elective courses.

Criminal Justice Degree Options
Associate of Science (A.S.)
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Criminal Justice Careers
Computer Security Expert
Court Officer
Domestic Violence Counselor
Federal Law Enforcement Officer
Evidence Technician
Forensic Scientist
Judge
Lawyer
Legal Assistant/Paralegal
Police Officer
Probations and Parole Officer
Private Investigator
Statistical Research Analyst
Warden
Youth Counselor

 

Courses

CJ 152 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
A study of the agencies, institutions, and processes of the American criminal justice system-legislature, police, attorneys, courts and corrections; the nature and extent of crime; legal defenses and the limits of the law; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure; cases and materials affecting criminal law, prosecution, defense, and the sentencing and sanctioning process in the control of criminal behavior. Prerequisite: ENG 098 or placement beyond.

CJ 273 Police Practices and Procedures
An overview of the organization and operations of law enforcement agencies, and their line, staff, and auxiliary functions. Focus shared between the police as a formal organization in patrol and investigative operations, and the role given law enforcement in the relationship of communal security and consent to governmental authority. Primary attention given to law enforcement ethics and professionalism, with some scenario-based instruction to illustrate these critical factors in law enforcement. Prerequisite: ENG 098 or placement beyond.

CJ 274 Community Policing
Examines the major concepts and problems involved in the widely-recognized shift in the operations of modern law enforcement. The course will examine the origins, continuing development, and experiences and record of community policing; a review of research and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of community policing. Prerequisite: CJ 152 or CJ 273.

CJ 280 Ethics in Criminal Justice
This course will develop a theoretical base for the examination of criminal justice practice and management in terms of its legality, morality, and ethical values; the primary method of instruction will be case-analysis of such topics as the behavior of police in a democratic society, theories of punishment and the rights of prisoners, the regulation of the behaviors of the officers of the court, and the significance of the rule of law for all criminal justice managers. Prerequisite: ENG 098 or placement beyond.

CJ 283 Corrections
Following an historical exploration of the correctional efforts in human societies and the more recent reforms of the American prison movement, this course will direct its study to six major areas: sentencing strategies and punishment rationale in democratic societies, the philosophy and effectiveness of treatment and rehabilitation, individual adjustment and social organization in both male and female prisons, constitutional sources and remedies in addressing prisoners’ rights, the professionalization of correctional professionals and emerging alternatives to incarceration. Prerequisite: ENG 098 or placement beyond.

CJ 285 Statistics for the Social Sciences
This course will examine both descriptive (e.g. distributions, central tendency, variability, graphic representations) and inferential (e.g. t-tests, Analysis of Variance) statistics within the context of the social sciences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the conditions that call for the use of one test over another. Students will be exposed to theory as well as to hands-on application through computer statistics packages such as SPSS. Prerequisites: CJ 152, PSY 110 or SOC 119 and MTH 111 or higher. Cross-listed as PSY 285 and SOC 285.

CJ 290 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit any number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisite: CJ 152.

CJ 291 Special Topics in Criminal Justice and Sociology
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit any number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisite: CJ 152 or SOC 119.

CJ 361 Victimology
While a relatively new field in criminology and criminal justice, the study of crime victims is just as important as the study of crime and criminals. The course will review sources of data on crime victims, the interaction between the victim and the criminal justice system, and different types of crime victims, such as intimate partners, children, women, men, and the elderly. Other topics related to Victimology may also be addressed. Prerequisites: CJ 152, PSY 110, or SOC 119. Cross-listed as SOC 361.

CJ 371 Criminological Theory
This course is an in-depth evaluation of classical and contemporary criminological theories. The course will review each major category of criminological theory, to include classical, biological, psychological, structural, subcultural, integrated theories, among others. Lastly, the course will examine how research on crime in the real world impacts criminologists’ ability to suggest and implement programmatic responses designed to reduce crime. Reading intensive. Prerequisites: ENG 099 or placement beyond and CJ 152 or SOC 119. Cross-listed as SOC 371.

CJ 375 Investigative Function in Law Enforcement
This is an introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Attention is given to police conduct at the crime scene, interrogation and interviews with suspects and witnesses, the development of informants, and surveillance techniques. Particular focus on special techniques appropriate to special kinds of investigation. Strong emphasis on preparation for trial, report writing, and the professional role of law enforcement in testimony. Prerequisite: CJ 273 or permission of the Instructor.

CJ 384 Community-Based Corrections
Problems of work-release and school-release programs for institutional inmates; administration of halfway houses; nonresidential programs for probationers, parolees, and drug abusers; assessment of the effectiveness and the purposes of the "community-based correctional facility" in contemporary corrections. Prerequisite: CJ 283, Sophomore standing, or permission of the Instructor.

CJ 452 Interdisciplinary Commons in Law, Justice, and Society
This "capstone" course will examine the cultural resources that have shaped and continue to provide alternatives to the criminal justice system: analysis of policy roles of the institutions of the criminal justice system within the framework of the functions of the law in American society. This inter-disciplinary course attempts to construct a philosophical basis and institutional identity for the entire major. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the Instructor. Cross-listed as PSY 452 and SOC 452.

CJ 463 Race, Ethnicity, Social Class, and Crime
This course will examine the complex inter-relationships between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on social class. The focus of the course will be on critical thinking regarding racial disparities and discrimination in the explanation of crime and in the criminal justice system. Reading intensive. Prerequisites: ENG 112 or ENG 115, SOC 119, CJ 152, completion of 12 hours of coursework in Criminal Justice and/or Sociology and Junior standing.

CJ 472 The Law of Criminal Justice
Viewing the criminal law as an instrument of social control, an extensive analysis will explore the broad range of legal principles bringing a criminal case: justification, attempt, conspiracy, parties to crime, ignorance and mistake, immaturity, insanity, and intoxication. Some consideration is given to rules of evidence in criminal cases. An exploration of the law of homicide is undertaken as a device to test the rules by which the law is applied. The common law, selected statutes of Kentucky and of representative states, and what the function of law is in society are studied. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the Instructor.

CJ 490 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit any number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisites: CJ 152 and Junior standing.

CJ 491 Special Topics in Criminal Justice and Sociology
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit any number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisite: CJ 152 or SOC 119 and Junior standing.

CJ 498 Practicum
A supervised work/study placement in a setting consistent with the student's interest and career goals. May be repeated for a total of 6 semester hours with 3 hours credited to the completion of a Sociology or Criminal Justice major and the remaining 3 hours credited as an upper division general elective. A student may earn no more than 6 hours of CJ 498 and SOC 498.Contacts with agencies arranged with permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of 15 hours of coursework in Sociology or Criminal Justice, and permission of faculty supervisor Cross-listed as SOC 498.

CJ 499 Directed Individual Study in Criminal Justice
A program of reading and reporting planned and carried out under the guidance of a faculty member in the major. The topic, issue, or area of student interest must concern a problem in the discipline not otherwise available to students. Interdisciplinary study is encouraged. Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of 15 hours of coursework in Criminal Justice, and permission of faculty supervisor, Division Chair, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Faculty

Name: Paula Baker
Title: Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
Email: PaulaBaker@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5116
Office: Armington 430

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