About

Why should I major in chemistry?

Chemistry, the central science, is an excellent springboard to a variety of challenging and rewarding careers. Chemistry is an important component in the fields of biology, medicine, earth science, environmental science and physics. The University of Pikeville offers the breadth and depth in its chemistry curriculum to ensure students develop critical thinking skills and attain the knowledge necessary to succeed in an ever-changing and increasingly scientific world. Future chemists will play a crucial role on protecting the environment, providing new energy sources, eliminating health hazards and feeding the world. Additionally, advances in the areas of biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, industrial hygiene and computer automation in chemical analysis will result in an increasing demand for graduates with chemistry degrees.

What can I do with a chemistry degree from the University of Pikeville?
Typically, chemistry graduates continue their education by pursuing postgraduate or professional degrees that provide an opportunity for specialization in specific subject areas and/or participation in research. Many who enter the workforce immediately after graduation choose employment related to their degree. However, the numerical, analytical and problem-solving skills chemistry majors develop are highly regarded by employers in many other fields. Approximately sixty percent of chemistry graduates recently entering the workforce found jobs in industry. Other employment opportunities were provided by schools, universities and hospitals. About thirty percent of the industrial jobs for recent graduates were related to pharmaceuticals.

Chemistry at the University of Pikeville
The chemistry program is part of the Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. This program provides a general background for students seeking to prepare for careers in teaching, entry-level positions in scientific occupations, or further study in graduate or professional schools. Courses in chemistry provide a basic understanding of the components and processes related to the composition and uses of matter.

English Degree Options
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Chemistry Careers
Chemistry Teacher, Postsecondary
Chemical Technician
Chemist
Chemical Engineer
Soil and Plant Scientist
Chemical Equipment Operator and Tender
Chemical Plant and System Operator
Nuclear Monitoring Technician
Biochemical Engineer
Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologist
Food Scientists and Technologist
Biochemists and Biophysicist
Quality Control Systems Manager
Quality Control Analyst
Biological Science Teacher, Postsecondary
Secondary School Teacher
Sales Representative, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products
Mixing and Blending Machine Setter, Operator, and Tender
Food Science Technicians
Courses

CHE 100 Introduction to Chemistry
A survey course for those not pursuing a chemistry major or minor. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: MTH 111 or placement beyond. Cannot be taken if student has already passed CHE 113 or its equivalent. Additionally, it is recommended that the accompanying laboratory (CHE 101) be taken concurrently.

CHE 101 Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory
Laboratory course to accompany Introduction to Chemistry lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Corequisite: CHE 100 or consent of the Instructor. Cannot be taken if student has already passed CHE 115 or its equivalent.

CHE 113 General Chemistry I
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry. The course provides the background necessary for further studies in chemistry and related areas. Topics studied include stoichiometry, gas laws, electronic and nuclear structure of the atom, chemical bonding and molecular structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Three hours of lecture per week; accompanied by a lab course. Pre- or corequisites: MTH 113 or placement beyond; Corequisite: CHE 115.

CHE 114 General Chemistry II
Continuation of the study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. A continuation of CHE 113. Three hours of lecture per week; accompanied by a lab course. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 113; Corequisite: CHE 116.

CHE 115 General Chemistry I Laboratory
Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry I lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Corequisite: CHE 113 or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 116 General Chemistry II Laboratory
Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry II lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 115; Corequisite: CHE 114 or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 147 Laboratory Safety
A survey of laboratory safety principles. Course topics will include common laboratory safety practices, chemical hazards, biological hazards, personal protective equipment, chemical hazard communication, emergency procedures and other aspects of laboratory safety. Prerequisite: CHE 100 or higher.

CHE 313 Organic Chemistry I
A study of the chemistry of carbon designed for chemistry majors and preprofessionals. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 114 and CHE 116; Corequisite: CHE 315.

CHE 314 Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of CHE 313. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 313; Corequisite: CHE 316.

CHE 315 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Laboratory to accompany Organic Chemistry I lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CHE 116; Corequisite: CHE 313.

CHE 316 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Laboratory to accompany Organic Chemistry II lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CHE 315; Corequisite: CHE 314.

CHE 321 Quantitative Analysis
Classical and modern techniques of analytical chemistry, emphasizing laboratory work in quantitative measurement. Three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 114 and CHE 116.

CHE 322 Instrumental Analysis
A study of the fundamentals of instrumental analysis covering the major spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CHE 321, PHY 224, and a grade of "C" or better in CHE 313 and CHE 315; or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 400 Physical Chemistry I
A presentation of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics. Topics include equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, entropy, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibrium, and physical transformations of materials. The course consists of four hours of lecture and practicum each week. Prerequisites: MTH 222, PHY 223, PHY 224 and a grade of "C" or better in CHE 114 and 116; or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 401 Physical Chemistry II
A continuation of Chemistry 400. A study of the physical principles underlying chemical reactions. The focus will be on spectroscopy and chemical kinetics. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHE 400 or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 425 Biochemistry
A study of the chemistry of biological systems. The course will cover such topics as proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, biosynthesis, and catabolism. This course serves as an introduction to post-graduate level biochemistry. The course consists of four hours of lecture and practicum each week. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 314 and CHE 316. It is recommended that students have had BIO 151 prior to taking biochemistry.

CHE 435 Inorganic Chemistry
A study of the chemistry of the elements and inorganic compounds, including theoretical and structural concepts. The course consists of four hours of lecture and practicum each week. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in CHE 314 and CHE 316; or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 480 Seminar in Chemistry
Presentation of current and historical topics in chemistry. The course emphasizes practice in the presentation of oral and written reports. As part of the course, students will be assessed regarding their knowledge of the field of chemistry. Prerequisites: At least 20 semester hours of chemistry and senior standing or consent of the Instructor.

CHE 490 Special Topics
A study of a selected topic of special interest. May be proposed by either the Instructor or students, and may be taken for credit a number of times, provided a different topic is studied each time. Prerequisites: At least a junior science major and consent of the Instructor.

CHE 498 Lab Internship (Chemistry)
The student assists in instruction of a chemistry lab under the supervision of the laboratory instructor. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in the lab and lecture course being assisted with and the consent of the lab course Instructor. Students assisting with CHE 101 may substitute a "C" or better in CHE 113 and CHE 115 for the prerequisite requirement.

CHE 499 Directed Individual Study Study based on the interest and need of the student. May include advanced course work, literature search, and/or laboratory work. Credit of one to three hours each semester, for a maximum of two semesters. Prerequisites: At least 20 semester hours of chemistry and approval of a chemistry faculty member, Division Chair, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Faculty

Name: Benjamin Clayton
Title: Chair, Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences and Associate Professor of Chemistry
Email: BenjaminClayton@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5477
Office: Armington 461

Name: Kathleen McCann
Title: Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Email: KathleenMcCann@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5478
Office: Armington 306

Name: Sarah Stahl
Title: Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Email: SarahStahl@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5485
Office: Armington 307

There has never been a better time to be a UPIKE Bear! APPLY NOW
UPike Tigers