About

Why should I major in biology?

To study biology is to explore the amazing diversity of life – from the fundamental processes taking place within and between the molecules of cells, to the interactions among populations of living creatures throughout our vast global ecosystems on a planetary scale. Biology is a fast-moving discipline, always striving to push beyond the barriers of present knowledge to uncover new insights about life and its many processes. Students who major in biology at the University of Pikeville will find a program designed to encourage the development of biologists who are aware of the processes and techniques of modern biology as well as able to communicate and apply biological knowledge.

What can I do with a biology degree from the University of Pikeville?
An individual with a degree in biology from the University of Pikeville has much more than a piece of paper indicating completion of courses. In addition to acquiring a strong foundation in the sciences, graduates of this program are able to think critically, gather experimental data and analyze the results. The emphasis on basic laboratory skills combined with critical analysis give Pikeville alumni advantages when applying for employment or continuing their education. While a number of graduates from the program are employed immediately following graduation, most students further their education seeking postgraduate or professional degrees. Whatever your ultimate goals, the biology program at the University of Pikeville will provide the training and experience needed to ensure your success.

Biology at the University of Pikeville
The biology program is a part of the Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. It provides a rigorous curriculum that enables students to develop an understanding of and an appreciation for the diversity of living organisms and their structure, function and interactions. Most courses emphasize laboratory and/or field activities. The program is designed to prepare students to enter science-related fields of business, to teach biology in high school, to meet professional school entrance requirements and for further study in graduate school.

Biology Degree Options
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Biology Careers
Research
Biomedical
Botany
Ecology
Environmental Biology
Genetics
Microbiology
Molecular Biology
Wildlife Biology
Zoology

Professional Programs
Dentistry
Education
Law
Medical Technology
Medicine
Optometry
Pharmacy
Physician Assistant
Physical Therapy
Veterinary Medicine

Courses

BIO 100 Introduction to Biology 
A survey course for those not taking a biology major or minor. Three hours of lecture per week; accompanied by a lab course. Prerequisite: MTH 098 or placement beyond. Corequisite: BIO 101 or consent of Instructor. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.

BIO 101 Introduction to Biology Lab
Laboratory to accompany Introduction to Biology lecture. Three hours of lab per week. Pre- or corequisite: BIO 100 or consent of the Instructor.Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.

BIO 102 Introductory Biology 
This is a laboratory-science survey course for those not planning to major or minor in biology. The course employs integrated lecture and inquiry based instruction. Five hours of combined lecture and lab per week. Prerequisite: MTH 099 or placement beyond. Does not count toward a major or 
minor in Biology.
 
BIO 108 Human Body Structure and Function 
This course is a survey of the human body including cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, two hours per week. Pre-corequisite: ENG 112. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.

BIO 151 Principles of Biology I
The hypothetico-deductive nature of scientific inquiry is introduced and is used as a foundation for the exploration of cellular organization and function. Topics covered include atomic bonding, the structure and importance of water to life, macromolecules essential to life, enzyme kinetics, eukaryotic cell structure, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, an introduction to Mendelian genetics, and the structure and function of DNA. Although the course focuses on the cellular level and below, the importance of these structures and processes to the organism is continually considered. Pre- or corequisite: MTH 111 or placement beyond. Recommended: One year of high school biology or chemistry and co-registration in CHE 113.
 
BIO 152 Principles of Biology II
A survey course of Earth’s biodiversity, including the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains, intended for students to gain an understanding and appreciation of organismal diversity. Taxonomy, phylogeny, and life histories of various taxonomic groups will also be discussed in order to address evolutionary relationships and morphological and physiological differences among groups. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in BIO 151.
 
BIO 171 Anatomy and Physiology I
This course provides the students with insight into the human body, primarily at the cellular and tissue levels. Topics include histology, muscles, bones, nervous systems, and cellular metabolism. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite MTH 099 or placement beyond. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 172 Anatomy and Physiology II
In this course, the human body is investigated primarily at the system level. Areas of study include: respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: MTH 099 or placement beyond. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 250 Human Anatomy
A comparative study of the anatomical structure of the human body. Interrelated functions of the structure are described. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Does not replace BIO 330. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 251 Human Physiology 
A course designed to meet the needs of allied health students. The functions of the body systems are studied with emphasis on systems' interrelationships and disease states. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in BIO 250. Does not replace BIO 420. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 273 Clinical Microbiology 
This course is designed for allied health students in need of a broad foundation in microbiology as well as insight into the role microorganisms play in health and disease. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in BIO 171 and BIO 172. Does not replace BIO 350. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 280 Medical Terminology
A course designed to build the vocabulary of students who are enrolled in or are preparing to enroll in a medically related program of study. Students will become familiar with specific prefixes and suffixes, which will enable them to deduce the meaning of unfamiliar scientific and medically related words. Students will also become proficient in navigating scientific and health related websites. Prerequisites: A grade of a “C” or better in ENG 111 or ENG 114. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 300 General Entomology 
Fundamentals of insect biology and their relationships with plants and other organisms; identification of orders and families of commonly encountered insects. A collection and field trips will be required. Lecture, three hours per week; laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisite: One three hour course in biology.
 
BIO 303 Introduction to Evolution
This course covers topics in evolution, cocentrating on the Darwinian theories of evolution including descent with modification, natural selection sexual selection patterns of evolution, the genetic source of variation, measuring evolution, adaptation, speciation, and human evolution. Lecture: three hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 151, BIO 152 and BIO 320.
 
BIO 313 Botany 
A study of the development, morphology, taxonomy and physiology of plants. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 314 Vertebrate Zoology
A comparative study of the morphology, phylogeny, and ecology of representative vertebrae animals and groups. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 319 Genetics - BIO 320 Genetics(with laboratory)
An introductory study of the fundamental principles and mechanics of inheritance, including human applications. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152. Recommended: MTH 200.
 
BIO 321 Invertebrate Zoology 
A comparative study of the morphology, phylogeny, and ecology of representative invertebrate animals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 325 Ecology I 
A discussion of fundamental principles of ecology including adaptations of organisms to the environment; factors that influence the distribution and abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation; community development (succession), structure and function; food webs, energy flow, and nutrient cycling. A special focus will be placed on the natural history of Kentucky as well as field study methodology and literature research. Lecture: three hours per week. Includes a required four hour laboratory, meeting every other week, with extensive field-work requirements. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152 and MTH 113 or placement beyond.
 
BIO 330 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 
A comparative study of the morphology, phylogeny, and ecology of vertebrate animals based on protochordates, the dogfish, Necturus, and the cat. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 350 Microbiology
A study of the morphology, physiology, genetics, and taxonomy of bacteria and other microorganisms, and their beneficial and harmful relationships to plants and animals. Laboratory methods of cultivation, examination, and identification of bacteria will be stressed. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 375 Animal Behavior 
A study of the selective forces influencing animal behavior. Focal topics include communication, sexual selection, parental care, group living, cooperation and conflict, dispersal and migration, foraging, and predator avoidance. Students will be encouraged to read outside material, to think carefully, logically, and critically about ideas, and to ask questions and defend their views in class. Some field work will be required. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 400 Molecular Biology of the Cell
Further study of eukaryotic cell structure, function, and regulation of activity. Topics covered include the structure, activity, assembly, "death," and  targeting of proteins; membrane structure and function; the structure and function of eukaryotic organelles, transmembrane signaling; the cytoskeleton; cell cycle regulation; cancer; and techniques used in cell biology. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152, and BIO 320. Pre- or corequisites: CHE 313 and CHE 315.
 
BIO 402 General Parasitology 
A study of the life cycles of the parasites of man and selected domestic animals, with emphasis on the clinical manifestations. Laboratory methods will include examination and identification of parasitic organisms. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 405 Embryology 
A study of organismal development, with a particular emphasis on molecular events. Developmental abnormalities due to genetic defects and environmental influences will also be explored. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152, and BIO 320.
 
BIO 411 Ecology II
Further study of ecological principles introduced in BIO 310. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may include population ecology, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, or environmental ecology. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152, and BIO 325.
 
BIO 420 General Physiology 
General physiological principles of the organ systems of vertebrates, with a particular emphasis on normal physiology and pathophysiology of humans, will be examined in this course. The following topics will be covered: cellular physiology, neurophysiology, muscle physiology, cardiovascular and respiratory physiology, metabolism, renal physiology, acid/base balance, and endocrine function. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152, and CHE 114, and junior-level standing with at least 19 credit hours of BIO courses that count toward the major.
 
BIO 430 Immunology
A study of the immune system including the basic structure of the immunoglobulins, the immune response, interaction of antigen and antibody, immunity to infection, rejection mechanisms of transplantation and autoimmunity. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152, and BIO 350. Recommended: BIO 400 and CHE 425.
 
BIO 440 Histology 
The microscopic study of the cells and tissues of the body. Different types of microscopy will be discussed, with an emphasis on light microscopy. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152.
 
BIO 441 Neurobiology 
A study of the histology, anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIO 151 and BIO 152. Recommended BIO 420.
 
BIO 480 Seminar in Biology
Presentation of current and historical topics in biology. The course emphasizes practice in presentation of oral and written reports. As parts of the course, students will be assessed regarding their knowledge of the field of biology. Prerequisites: At least 20 semester hours of BIO courses that count toward the major and senior standing or consent of the Instructor.
 
BIO 490 Special Topics
A study of a selected topic of special interest. The topic may differ each time the course is offered and may be proposed by either the instructor or students. Prerequisites: At least a junior science major and consent of the Instructor.
 
BIO 498 Lab Internship (Biology)
The student assists in instruction of a freshman level biology lab under the supervision of the laboratory instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Recommended: CHE 147. Does not count toward a major or minor in Biology.
 
BIO 499 Directed Independent Study 
Individual research or study based on the interests and needs of the student. Credit of one to four hours each semester for a maximum of two semesters. A total of 4 credit hours may be counted toward a biology major. Prerequisites: 18 semester hours of biology and approval of a sponsoring biology faculty member, Division Chair, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Faculty

Name: Mark Bolt
Title: Professor of Biology
Email: MarkBolt@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5462
Office: Armington 104

Name: Harold Chittum
Title: Professor of Biology
Email: HaroldChittum@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5468
Office: Armington 107

Name: Darla French
Title: Associate Professor of Biology
Email: DarlaFrench@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5616
Office: Armington 430

Name: Phillip Jen
Title: Professor of Biology
Email: phillipjen@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5479
Office: Armington Science Center 106

Name: Timothy Whittier
Title: Professor of Biology and Director of Study Abroad
Email: TimothyWhittier@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5470
Office: Armington 214B

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