About

Why should I major in english?
The English program is designed to help you acquire an understanding of your literary heritage and its relationship to contemporary life, develop an appreciation and practical knowledge of the modes of literary expressions and prepare students for advanced work in English language and literature. English is a major branch of the language arts and its main focus is on the written word. The appropriate use and understanding of English is considered basic to the American way of life and reflects a person’s level of educational achievement. There are many occupations that do not require a specific undergraduate major but lend themselves particularly to English majors; they are often learned as a result of on-the-job training rather than prior education. What is sought among prospective employees are certain skills and abilities that can be developed through an academic major and internships, directed studies, tutorials, seminars, work-study and summer employment and volunteer experiences.

What can I do with an English degree from the University of Pikeville?
Traditionally, majors in English go on to graduate school in English with the aim of eventually teaching in higher education. Additionally, English majors may be certified to teach high school in Kentucky. Some English majors become professional creative writers (novelists, poets, etc.). Increasingly, employers in business, industry and government are hiring English majors because students with degrees in English are known to have good communication skills and such skills are in demand. Finally, an English education also provides students with excellent preparation for further education in professions such as law and publishing.

English at the University of Pikeville
The English program is a part of the Division of Humanities. It fosters an understanding of the literary tradition and is designed to teach students to think critically, to write effectively and to develop an aesthetic sensibility through course offerings in composition, language and literature. An appreciation of our literary and cultural traditions and facility with the use of the English language are fundamental prerequisites for successful leadership and service in our society. This program provides students with the opportunity to major or minor in English and to prepare for teacher certification. The English major offers access to internships, directed studies, tutorials, seminars, work-study and volunteer experiences.

Career Opportunities
Students with degrees in English are known to have good communication abilities and are recognized for their sharp critical and analytical thinking skills. Because the major places a premium on written and verbal capabilities, the English student is prepared for law school and graduate school in the humanities. Traditionally, many majors go on to teach in higher education, but it is not uncommon for them to go into business, industry or government positions. Some English majors become professional creative writers such as novelists and poets or pursue a writing career in journalism or publishing.

English Degree Options
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

English Careers
Attorney
Broadcast Advertising Manager
Consultant
Creative Director
News Reporter
Newspaper/Magazine Editor
Novelist
Press Secretary
Public Relations Specialist
Publications Manager
Publisher/Indexer
Screenwriter
Teacher/Professor
Television Producer
 
Courses

University of Pikeville’s senior capstone course requires students to write and revise a selected piece of critical or creative work to submit to a professional venue. English majors are not only accepted in regional and national conferences but are also recognized with awards and publications among a competitive pool of undergraduate submissions.

Our majors have presented at a number of conferences in Kentucky and nationally including the Kentucky Philological Association Convention, the Annual Medieval-Renaissance Conference at University of Virginia-Wise, the Appalachian Studies Conference, the International Sigma Tau Delta Convention and the National Undergraduate Literature Conference.

ENG 098 Foundations of Writing I
(See Developmental Studies)
 
ENG 099 Foundations of Writing II
(See Developmental Studies)
 
ENG 111 Composition I
This course focuses on practical instruction in the process of reading, planning and writing short essays, with emphasis on rhetorical strategies for structure and development and on the basic rules of grammar and punctuation. Prerequisite: ENG 099 or placement by examination.
 
ENG 112 Composition II
This course focuses on additional instruction and practice in writing with emphasis on argumentation and research. This course is designed to strengthen and refine the skills acquired in ENG 111. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or ENG 114.
 
ENG 114 Honors Composition I
This course focuses on practical instruction in the use of rhetorical strategies in the writing of short essays. Students will read a significant number of literary works and will write in response to these works. Participation in class discussion is an important element of the course. Prerequisite: ACT English subscore of 29 or higher.
 
ENG 115 Honors Composition II
This courses focuses on instruction in argumentation and research in regard to literary texts. The format of this course requires active in-class participation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 114, or completion of ENG 111 with a grade of “A” or “B” an ACT or SAT equivalent English subscore of 26 or higher and recommendation of English 111 instructor.
 
ENG 200 Introduction to Literature
A study of representative selections in the genres of fiction, drama and poetry, with emphasis on interpretation and appreciation. Critical approaches and terminology appropriate to each genre will be considered. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 115.

ENG 220 Introduction to Journalism
Emphasis on the skills of reporting. Practice in writing and editing news and sports stories, feature articles and magazine articles, with a glance at reviews, editorials and columns. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 115. Cross-listed as COM 220.

ENG 230 Women Authors
Survey of major women writers, including emphasis on historical and literary influences on their work and their social and cultural milieux. Prerequisite: ENG 200.
 
ENG 290 Special Topics
Study of a selected topic of special interest, such as a major author, historical period, literary genre or topic in literature. The topic may differ each time the course is offered and may be proposed by either instructor or student. Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 300 Survey of World Literature Since 1700
Historical literary study of major writers since 1700 in languages other than English. All readings will be English translations of the original works. Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 311 Advanced Composition
More practice in writing exposition and argument with emphasis on developing a sophisticated and polished style. Readings in and discussions of logic, semantics and rhetorical strategies. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 115. Cross-listed as COM 311.

ENG 315 Linguistics
Study of modern grammar, usage and a variety of topics concerning language, including the nature and structure of language, language change and diversity. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 115. Cross-listed as COM 315.

ENG 320 Advanced Journalism
Advanced practices of journalism, including covering courts, police and governmental agencies and reporting investigative and feature stories. Legal and ethical issues unique to the profession of journalism are also studied. Prerequisite: COM 220 or ENG 220. Cross-listed as COM 320.

ENG 321 Publications Internship
Practical experience in writing and editing for a school publication. This course may be taken as many as three times for a total of three hours. Prerequisites: COM 310 and permission of Instructor. Cross-listed as COM 321.

ENG 325 Creative Writing
Practice in writing various forms of fiction and poetry with help from a study of theory and models. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 115.

ENG 330 Women Authors
Survey of major women writers, including emphasis on historical and literary influences on their work and their social and cultural milieux. Prerequisite: ENG 200.
 
ENG 340 Survey of British Literature I
Study of British writing from Beowulf to the Augustans with emphasis on poetry, drama and the essay.
Pre- or corequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 341 Survey of British Literature II
Study of British writing from the Romantics to the present with emphasis on poetry, drama, the essay and short fiction.
Pre- or corequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 342 Survey of American Literature I
Study of American writing from William Bradford through Emily Dickinson with emphasis on poetry, short fiction and non-fiction prose. Pre- or corequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 343 Survey of American Literature II
Study of American writing from Twain to the present with emphasis on poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay.
Pre- or corequisite: ENG 200.
 
ENG 345 Survey of Literary Criticism
Introduction to critical writing and critical theory from Plato and Aristotle to the post-modern period. Written assignments will focus on explication and applications of critical methodology. Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 357 World Mythology
A study of the religious and cultural functions of myth, including material from among Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Buddhist, Hindu, Chinese, Japanese, Jewish, Christian, Norse, African, Amerindian, Celtic and modern mythologies (students will have some input as to which cultures we deal with) as well as the work of scholars of myth and religion. We will look at how these mythologies show the worldviews of the cultures they represent and note ways in which their concerns and responses are both similar and different. Prerequisite: REL 213 or REL 214. Cross-listed as REL 357.

ENG 360 Shakespeare
Study of Shakespeare's major plays and poems in the context of the Elizabethan and Jacobean Ages.
Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 370 Appalachian Literature
Study of writers of the southern Appalachian region as well as the image of Appalachia and its people in literature.
Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 390 Special Topics
Study of a selected topic of special interest such as a major author, historical period, literary genre or topic in literature. The topic may differ each time the course is offered and may be proposed by either instructor or students. Prerequisite: ENG 200.

ENG 398 Journalism Internship
Practical experience with one or more local publications depending on the student's aim and the availability of positions. Each student must keep a portfolio of work and present a long paper recording and analyzing the experience. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Prerequisite: ENG 220.

ENG 400 English Senior Seminar
Capstone course for those majoring in English. Emphasis will be on critical approaches to literature, advanced literary terminology and analysis and the principles of English composition. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the English program and consent of Humanities Division Chair.

ENG 499 Directed Individual Study in English
Creative research or reading project devised by the student and pursued under the direction of an appropriate instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 200 and at least one literature course. Offered any session with consent of Instructor, Division Chair, and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Faculty

Name: Brigitte Anderson
Title: Professor of English
Email: BrigitteAnderson@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5021
Office: Armington 454

Name: Sydney England
Title: Associate Professor of English
Email: SydneyEngland@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5602
Office: Armington 425

Name: David Ermold
Title: Assistant Professor of English/Developmental Studies
Email: DavidErmold@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5464
Office: Armington 305

Name: Hannah Freeman
Title: Associate Professor of English/Director of Experiential Learning
Email: HannahFreeman@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5014
Office: Armington 455

Name: Charles Johnson
Title: Assistant Professor of English
Email: CharlesJohnson@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5113
Office: Armington 436

Name: James Riley
Title: Professor of English
Email: JamesRiley@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5010
Office: Armington 456

Name: Amanda Runyon
Title: Assistant Professor of English
Email: AmandaRunyon@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5345
Office: Armington 304

Name: Jennifer Steigerwalt
Title: Assistant Professor of English
Email: JenniferSteigerwalt@upike.edu
Phone: 606.218.5117
Office: Armington 453

An Evening of Literary Readings

Each spring semester, the English program at the University of Pikeville hosts “An Evening of Literary Readings” by current English majors. The presentations are designed to highlight the accomplishments of students accepted to participate in upcoming conferences across the state of Kentucky and around the country, as well as help prepare each student for the presentation of their work.

This year, the university had 12 students accepted to present at the 40th Annual Kentucky Philological Association Convention on the campus of Centre College in Danville, Ky. Four students and one recent alumnus were accepted to present at the International Sigma Tau Delta Convention in Portland, Ore., and three students were accepted to present at the National Undergraduate Literature Conference on the campus of Weber State University in Ogden, Utah.

Because of the overwhelming success of this year’s English majors, the evening’s presentations were limited to graduating seniors and those accepted to present at both the Sigma Tau Delta Convention in Portland and the National Undergraduate Literature Convention in Utah.

Seven students read from work produced in upper level writing and literature courses, but all those accepted to present were gathered for the evening’s performance and recognized for their accomplishments.

The students who read were:
Maggie Little, creative non-fiction, “Tay”
Nicholas Hunt, fiction, “The Proposal”
Ashley Adams, creative non-fiction, “The Storm”
Alex Anderson, creative non-fiction, “The Lights of the Bellagio”
Michael Rappazzo, creative non-fiction, “Wheel of Fortune”
Sara Blackburn, literary analysis, “Opium Use”
Brandi Pugh, creative non-fiction, “Cutting the Line”

Those recognized for having their work accepted include:
Donovan Swindall, fiction, “Lost in the Woods”
Seth Millar, creative non-fiction, “The Lesson”
Austin Baldwin, creative non-fiction, “The Run”
Kayla Morgan, creative non-fiction, “The Lesson“
Donna Nichols, fiction, “A Loss of Reality”

The evening’s presentations went very well, were well received and all those present gathered following the reading for a reception sponsored by the English faculty and Sigma Tau Delta.
UPIKE Annual Writing Competition Rewards

The English program at the University of Pikeville sponsors an annual writing competition open to all students at the university. Winners are announced each spring semester at the Honors Convocation. Awards are presented in four genres: creative non-fiction, fiction, poetry and critical writing and are supported by sponsors in the following categories:

The Sylvia Trent Auxier Poetry Prize
The Ruby Elizabeth Fizer Prize for Creative Non-fiction
The Carrie D. Kirkman Prize for Fiction 
The Anna Loos Prize for Critical Writing 

Past Winners:

2013


The Sylvia Trent Auxier Prize for Poetry:
First Prize: Brandi Pugh, Unpleasant Departure
Second Prize: Tira Dotson, The Cross
Third Prize: Lorraine Hampton, Half Awake

The Carrie D. Kirkman Prize for Fiction: 
First Prize: Brandi Pugh, Bitter Cold
Second Prize: Brandi Pugh, Returning Home
Third Prize: Donna Nichols, A Loss of Reality

The Anna Loos Prize for Critical Writing:
First Prize: Brandi Pugh, Unintended Racism
Second Prize: Alexander Anderson, Postmodern Characteristics in Literature
Third Prize: Ashley Adams, Emergence of the Feminine Voice in American Literature

The Ruby Elizabeth Fizer Prize for Creative Non-fiction:
First Prize: Alexander Anderson, Lights of Bellagio
Second Prize: Ashley Adams, Against the World
Third Prize: Brandi Pugh, Cutting the Line


2012

The Sylvia Trent Auxier Prize for Poetry:
First Prize: Maggie Little, “We Called Him Doolittle” 
Second Prize: Brandi Pugh, “Date Night” 
Third Prize: Tiffany Clevenger, “The Creation” 

The Carrie D. Kirkman Prize for Fiction: 
First Prize: Jennifer Charles, “Helping Sarah” 
Second Prize: James Pittman, “I See a Darkness” (ICAD) 
Third Prize: Brittany Frasure, “Somewhere Between”

The Anna Loos Prize for Critical Writing:
First Prize: Jennifer Charles, “Female Novelists and Feminine Intellect” 
Second Prize: Maggie Little, “A Modest Proposal” 
Third Prize: Brandi Pugh, “Ooronoko” 

The Ruby Elizabeth Fizer Prize for Creative Non-fiction:
First Prize: Jennifer Charles, “Act of Failure”
*No others entered for this category.


2011

The Sylvia Trent Auxier Prize for Poetry:
First Prize: Brittany Frasure 
Second Prize: Brittany Frasure 
Third Prize: Jennifer Charles 

The Carrie D. Kirkman Prize for Fiction: 
First Prize: Gary T. Smith 
Second Prize: Jennifer Charles 
Third Prize: Jennifer Charles 

The Anna Loos Prize for Critical Writing:
First Prize: Gary T. Smith
Second Prize: Gary T. Smith 
Third Prize: Gary T. Smith

The Ruby Elizabeth Fizer Prize for Creative Non-fiction: 
First Prize: Megan L. Smith
Second Prize: Brittany Thacker 
Third Prize: Brittany Thacker


2010

The Sylvia Trent Auxier Prize for Poetry:
First Prize: Robert Walker, “2211” 
Second Prize: Ravin M. Fields, “Radiation Therapy”
Third Prize: Adam Adkins, “Cravings” 

The Aurelia Jenkins Morris Prose Fiction Prize:
First Prize: Ronnie Hylton, “Finding Sesame Street”
Second Prize: Gary Thomas Smith, “Getting There”
Third Prize: Robert Walker, “Fracture”

The Anna Loos Critical Writing Prize:
First Prize: Tara Burchett, “The Impact of Pain” 
Second Prize: Megan Smith, “The Roles of Women in Pope's Society”
Third Prize: Gary Thomas Smith, “Enamored of an Ass”

The Ralph and Marietta Hogston Prize for Creative Non-fiction:
First Prize: Megan Smith, “If the String Swings” 
Second Prize: Ravin M. Fields, “Cash for Diapers”
Third Prize: Jason Campagna, “Dirt Roads by Night”
Sigma Tau Delta

The University of Pikeville chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the international English Honors Society for four-year colleges and universities, is dedicated to fostering literacy and all aspects of the discipline of English. There are more than 825 local chapters in the U.S. and abroad. Our students have presented in St. Louis, Mo., New Orleans, La., Pittsburgh, Pa., and Portland, Ore., to name a few.

Sigma Tau Delta has been an active part of campus life at UPIKE for more than 10 years. A formal induction ceremony is held each year for new members, as well as fundraisers to help support the club’s activities, outreach programs to local schools and participation in an annual convention, which is held in some of the most exciting cities in the U.S.
 
Sigma Tau Delta members participated in a number of “Poetry in the Schools” and “Poetry Out Loud” events at local high schools. UPIKE’s chapter has also sponsored a “World Book Night” and a “Better World Books Drive” to provide books to those in need around the world. 

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